Everything is The Worst. [PINNED POST]

August 17th, 2017 4:06 pm by Kelly Garbato

(More below the fold…)

Book Review: Yes, I’m Hot in This: The Hilarious Truth about Life in a Hijab by Huda Fahmy (2018)

January 15th, 2019 7:00 am by Kelly Garbato

Brilliant.

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through Netgalley. Trigger warning for Islamophobia, racism, and sexism.)

Cartoonist, educator, and former law student Huda Fahmy was born and raised in Michigan – but this doesn’t stop strangers from asking her where she’s really from, or commenting on the exoticism of her (midwestern) accent. Yes, I’m Hot in This: The Hilarious Truth about Life in a Hijab is a collection of her webcomics – originally seen on Instagram* – which deal with the racist, sexist, and xenophobic microaggressions she struggles with on the daily, as a Muslim WOC living in Drumpf’s America. (Spoiler alert: things were pretty shitty pre-2016 too.)

The result is usually cutting, often depressing, and yet (amazingly) always hilarious. Fahmy possesses a sense of humor that’s equally wicked and witty. She’ll have you lol-ing even as you die a little inside. People can be assholes, but Fahmy has discovered the secret recipe for making assholaid. (Erm, chocolate milkshakes? Idk.)

Don’t be a Small-Minded Susan, read this book! Pay special attention to Chapter 6: It Never Hurts to Hope, for some examples of allyship (and just plain human kindness) in action.

* Maybe this will be the straw that finally makes me create an account?

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2019-01-14

January 15th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-13

January 14th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-12

January 13th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-11

January 12th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

Book Review: [Dis]Connected: Poems and Stories of Connection and Otherwise edited by Michelle Halket (2018)

January 11th, 2019 7:00 am by Kelly Garbato

Uneven, yet ultimately worth it.

three out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for rape.)

“There is a story about a man who watched me bathe nude and was so overcome with adoration and desire that he approached me. They say I turned him into a deer before he could even speak and watched his hunting dogs rip at his flesh. Men have spent thousands of years romanticizing their unwanted advances, their assaults. They have spent just as long demonizing women for their anger and their retribution.”

– “The Unholy Wild,” Trista Mateer

Mama raised us on her own, a house full of girls, though it wasn’t really a house. We lived up on the third floor and every summer when the heat would rise, we would fight like animals over the bathroom for a cool shower and a few moments of privacy. And when the door-banging and screaming stopped and one of us was nursing bruised knuckles, Mama would call us out into the living room. “I am raising a house full of girls,” she’d say, her voice tired. And the three of us would look down at our feet, quiet and sorry. Because Mama only ever called us girls when we had really fucked up.

Otherwise, she called us her babies, and she loved us even more than she was afraid for us.

– “Ultra,” Yena Sharma Purmasir

It’s a shame, really, how humans try to take the things they’re not allowed to have.

– “Small Yellow Cottage On The Shore,” Amanda Lovelace

So the concept behind this collection of poems and short stories, explained by editor Michelle Halket in the intro, is brimming with promise and intrigue:

The concept and theme of the book are of being connected. We seem to live in a hyper connected world, yet we increasingly hear stories of loneliness, isolation and disconnect. This book is about connecting poets with each other; connecting poetry with short fiction; and publishing stories about connection and/or a lack thereof. The premise was this: Each of the fully participating authors was to submit three poems adhering to this theme. These three poems would be assigned to a randomly chosen counterpart. That counterpart would select one of the poems and write a short story based on it.

Like most anthologies, though, the result is somewhat uneven: There are pieces I loved, adored, and cherished – poems and short works of fiction that will stick with me for days and weeks to come. Others were merely forgettable, and there were even one or two that I skimmed or skipped altogether. That said, the gems are shiny enough to make the mining worth it.

Let’s start with the premise. Whereas I expected (rightly or not) a focus on technology, and how it binds us together – and drives us apart – the theme of connection was approached in a much more general way. More often than not, “connection” was just a stand-in for relationships, and all their messy bits: love and loss, joy and grief, rebellion and oppression. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but I had hoped for a collection with a sharper focus. You might feel otherwise.

The convention of further linking each piece together by repeating a line from the previous work, while an interesting idea, didn’t work for me in practice: rather than feeling organic, the lifted lines mostly had a clunky feel to them. I don’t think it helped that they appeared in bold to further draw attention to them. I think it would have been more fun to let the reader spot the bridges for herself, no?

As for the pieces themselves, I’ll be honest: I picked up [Dis]Connected for one reason and one reason only – because Amanda Lovelace’s name was connected to the project. And her contributions do not disappoint! Her poems are among my favorites; “A Book and Its Girl” is both playful and lovely, and “Sisters: A Blessing” hints at what’s in store for us with her third installment in the Women Are Some Kind of Magic series, The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One.

Ditto: “Small Yellow Cottage on The Shore,” in which a sea witch must defeat the scariest monsters of them all – entitled white men – in order to save the love of her life, a selkie kidnapped for the purposes of sex trafficking and forced marriage. Oh, and her long lost love, another selkie similarly victimized. (The only thing I didn’t love about this story? That they let the dudebros live. This isn’t a silly prank or harmless mistake, but rather organized, systemic rape. LET YOUR RETRIBUTION RAIN DOWN FROM THE SKY! SLAY THEM ALL! LET NO RAPIST DRAW ANOTHER EARTHLY BREATH!)

[Dis]Connected also introduced me to some new favorites: every word Yena Sharma Purmasir writes is magic, from her short story “Ultra,” to the poems “Things That Aren’t True” and “If My Aunt Was On Twitter @lovelydurbangirl.” Trista Mateer’s “The Unholy Wild” gives a voice to Artemis, goddess of the hunt, along with a girlfriend and (an ever narrowing) place in contemporary society. It is wild and beautiful and fiercely feminist; it’s no mystery why I pictured her as a topless Leslie Knope. Iain S. Thomas’s “Driving With Strangers” is alive with some of the most achingly beautiful imagery you’ll ever read, while “A Way To Leave” by R.H. Swaney and Liam Ryan’s “The Train” are the most wonderful kind of melancholy.

The only piece I actively disliked – had a visceral “oh gross!” reaction to, in point o’ facts – is “Where the Sea Meets the Sky” by Cyrus Parker. A #MeToo story told from the perspective of the (accidental? are we really supposed to read it that way?) rapist, it just felt wrong and unnecessary. Our culture is overflowing with this POV; what are we to gain from experiencing a “date rape” through the perpetrator’s eyes? Hard pass.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2019-01-10

January 11th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-09

January 10th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @AnimalsAsia: Rescued from 15 years in a tiny cage just last month, sun bear Aurora is loving her new den. During her 45-day quarantine,… ->
  • The Trump admin is accelerating efforts to monitor social media in order to preempt anti-government protests within… https://t.co/VHBPThQJWk ->
  • RT @SarahEBond: Good morning, academics making their syllabi at the last minute. Q:
    1. How many women have you included in your readings?… ->
  • RT @MeredithIreland: I’ve been lucky to have early access to some fantastic 2019 books, so how about a giveaway? RT by 1/16 and one winner… ->
  • RT @thehill: JUST IN: FDA says routine food inspections stopped because of shutdown, raising health concerns https://t.co/1RJl2CQZM8 https:… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2019-01-08

January 9th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @chick_in_kiev: but while you’re here let’s talk a bit about cbp https://t.co/BDJ68EJTP0 ->
  • RT @MSNBC: WATCH: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez delivers impassioned response to President Trump’s address: “The president should be really defe… ->
  • RT @fvmero: I can’t believe Andy Samberg actually called out the US government for the assassination of members of the Black Panther party… ->
  • RT @NatGeo: For over a decade, researchers searched in vain for another Hawaiian tree snail for George to mate with, to no avail. He died a… ->
  • RT @crysrensmith: I just got my character card/bookmarks and posters in the mail so it is time for a #GIVEAWAY! Follow+RT for your chance t… ->
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Book Review: To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel by Fred Fordham & Harper Lee (2018)

January 8th, 2019 7:00 am by Kelly Garbato

A faithful adaptation, for better or worse.

three out of four stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through Edelweiss. Trigger warning for rape and racist violence.)

My feelings on this are conflicted and messy:

– How do you judge an adaptation of an existing work: on its own merits, or in its faithfulness to the source material? On the latter point, Fred Fordham’s adaptation is a definite success. His graphic novel adaptation is loyal to both the plot and tone of Harper Lee’s classic, and even plays on the nostalgia of the 1962 movie. Comic book Atticus is a dead ringer for Gregory Peck, and the Finch kids resemble their respective actors as well.

– My first experience with To Kill a Mockingbird was as a tween, well before I had to tools and knowledge to identify its more problematic aspects, chiefly the novel’s inherent racism. Revisiting the story as an adult, in a different format, was…jarring. Some of the racism is plainly evident, e.g., is it ever okay for a white writer to use the n-word, even if historically accurate? And isn’t it kind of gross for a story about Jim Crow racism and the lynching of a black man to center white voices? But there are so many layers to unpack, including liberal hero Atticus Finch’s racism. (If he existed today, Atticus might be one of people pleading for “civility” from both sides. Yuck.) I found myself cringing as much as tearing up.

And that’s kind of the crux of the matter, right? No doubt To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel will evoke all sorts of nostalgia (coupled with an irrational desire to protect and defend a cherished piece of one’s childhood), especially in white Americans; but don’t let that prevent you from engaging with the book critically.

fwiw, I’d love to see a reimagining of Harper Lee’s story told from Calpurnia or Helen Robinson’s perspective.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2019-01-07

January 8th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-06

January 7th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-05

January 6th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-04

January 5th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @monaeltahawy: I am a massive fan of profanity. Fuck civility! I wrote this about the importance of profanity for women in defying, diso… ->
  • RT @CPConrad: agnes varda literally stepping on a man's back to shoot her first film, an absolute icon https://t.co/9FuSICJlde ->
  • RT @jamesearl23: Excited to finally share a sneak peak at my first animated film, “FELIX.” 🖤🐶💫 https://t.co/y71bguw0Qp ->
  • RT @thejoshkeefe: For some context regarding @AOC's proposal today: the top marginal tax rate in the U.S. between 1936 and 1980 never dippe… ->
  • RT @ashversity: Shu Shu, my best friend, changed my life. She has been battling sickness the last few months & was recently diagnosed with… ->
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tweets for 2019-01-03

January 4th, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2019-01-02

January 3rd, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @IlhanMN: 23 years ago, from a refugee camp in Kenya, my father and I arrived at an airport in Washington DC.
    Today, we return to that… ->
  • RT @filmgloss: holy shit https://t.co/kwQ1MOyeO9 ->
  • RT @MuslimIQ: Here's America's racism & misogyny problem in a nutshell
    2 Black men walk into a Starbucks—mind their own business
    •Manager… ->
  • RT @MuslimIQ: He is Daniel Taylor & he’s been arrested.
    This video summarizes how men murder 1600 women/year in America:
    •Violent man atta… ->
  • RT @MuslimIQ: Hey @McDonalds this is in your St Petersburg, FL store:
    •Violent white man verbally & physically assaults a black female empl… ->
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2018 Book Memories Challenge

January 2nd, 2019 2:00 pm by Kelly Garbato


 

I don’t think this challenge is still technically a thing, but I enjoy it, so here we go! Caution: thar may be spoilers ahead.

P.S. Wasn’t Mags something? I sure am gonna miss photographing you with appropriately-named books, old gal. BFFs 5EVER.

 

  1. Wayward (Wayward Pines #2) by Blake Crouch (2013)

    “I think he’s trying to preserve our way of life.”
    “For who? Us or him?”

    A millennium without air or light pollution made for pitch-black skies. The stars didn’t just appear anymore. They exploded. Diamonds on black velvet. You couldn’t tear your eyes away.

  2. My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf (2012)

  3. The Last Town (Wayward Pines #3) by Blake Crouch (2014)

    “It’s strange,” Ethan said. “The world belongs to them now, but we still possess something they don’t have.”
    “What?”
    “Kindness. Decency. That’s what it is to be human. At our best at least.”
    Ben looked confused.
    “I think this abby is different,” Ethan said.
    “What do you mean?”
    “She has an intelligence, a gentleness I haven’t seen in any of the others. Maybe she has a family she wants to see again.”
    “We should shoot her and burn her with all the rest.”
    “And what would that accomplish? Feed our anger for a few minutes? What if we did the opposite? What if we sent her out into her world with a message about the species that once lived in this valley? I know it’s crazy, but I’m holding tight to the idea that a small act of kindness can have real resonance.”

    “The funny thing is, as bad as I am, I don’t have it in me to murder her husband. Is there a fate worse than being halfway evil?”

  4. Kim Reaper, Volume 1: Grim Beginnings (Kim Reaper #1-4) by Sarah Graley (2018)

  5. The New Hunger (Warm Bodies #1.5) by Isaac Marion (2015)

    Hours pass. Then his eyes remember how to focus, and the world sharpens. He thinks that he liked the world better before he could see it.

    It’s a strange feeling, being judged by a child. He’s seven years old; where the hell did he get a moral compass? Certainly not from his parents. Not even from her. She supposes there must be people in the world who stick to their principles, who always do the right thing, but they are few and far between, especially now. Where does a child get an idea as unnatural as goodness?

    Everyone living in these times knows the most important rule of conservation: if you have to kill someone, make sure they stay dead. It may be a losing battle, the math may be against the Living, but diligence in this one area will at least slow down the spread of the plague. Responsible murder is the new recycling.

    He finds a riot helmet and crams it down over his springy hair. “Halt!” he orders in cop-voice, and Nora smiles through a sudden rush of bittersweet sadness that takes her a moment to understand. She feels ashamed when she realizes it’s nostalgia. She has already begun missing him.

    Thirty-four miles north of the police station, a young girl who recently killed a young boy is watching beige houses flicker through the headlights of her family’s SUV. Her father’s eyes are tight on the road, her mother’s on everything around the road, pistol at the ready should anything incongruous emerge from this idyllic suburban scene. They are traveling later than they usually do, later than is safe, and the girl is glad. She hates sleeping. Not just because of the nightmares, but because everything is urgent. Because life is short. Because she feels a thousand fractures running through her, and she knows they run through the world. She is racing to find the glue.
    Thirty-four miles south of this girl, a man who recently learned he is a monster is following two other monsters up a steep hill in an empty city, because he can smell life in the distance and his purpose now is to take it. A brutish thing inside him is giggling and slavering and clutching its many hands in anticipation, overjoyed to finally be obeyed, but the man himself feels none of this. Only a coldness deep in his chest, in the organ that once pumped blood and feeling and now pumps nothing. A dull ache like a severed stump numbed in ice – what was there is gone, but it hurts. It still hurts.
    And three hundred feet north of these monsters are a girl and boy who are looking for new parents. Or perhaps becoming them. Both are strong, both are super smart and super cool, and both are tiny and alone in a vast, merciless, endlessly hungry world.
    All six are moving toward each other, some by accident, some by intent, and though their goals differ considerably, on this particular summer night, under this particular set of cold stars, all of them are sharing the same thought:
    Find people.

    (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2019-01-01

January 2nd, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

fuck yeah reading: 2018 books

January 1st, 2019 9:00 am by Kelly Garbato

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This year was a dumpster fire, both personally and politically/locally and globally/for reasons both obvious and not yet stated. Somehow I still found time to read a whopping 133 books, impressive even when you remove the kids’ 34-pagers from the equation. (There weren’t too many, and some were downright essential to my mental health, so.)

I set a pretty modest goal of one book a week and blew it out of the water, as illustrated by this bootyful Goodreads chart.

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(Low expectations, they are a lifesaver.)

My favorites are starred, but if you check out just a handful of my picks, may I suggest My Boyfriend is a Bear, Any Man, and/or Leslie Crawford and Sonja Stangl’s picture books about farmed animals who saved themselves? Pure joy there, folks.

P.S. I cheated on the cover gallery and left in some books that I received for review in 2018 but never quite got around to reading. They just looked so darn pretty there, and this way y’all have a preview of what I’ll be doing in the days and weeks to come. See if you can spot the extras for bonus points!

 

fuck yeah reading: 2018 book list

  1. Wayward (Wayward Pines #2) by Blake Crouch (2013)
  2. My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf (2012)
  3. The Last Town (Wayward Pines #3) by Blake Crouch (2014)
  4. Kim Reaper, Volume 1: Grim Beginnings (Kim Reaper #1-4) by Sarah Graley (2018); reviewed here
  5. The New Hunger (Warm Bodies #1.5) by Isaac Marion (2015); reread: originally reviewed here *
  6. Grrl Scouts: Magic Socks by Jim Mahfood (2017); reviewed here
  7. The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang (2018); reviewed here *
  8. Black Genealogy: Poems (The Mineral Point Poetry Series, Volume 6) by Kiki Petrosino and Lauren Haldeman (2017); reviewed here
  9. Black Comix Returns edited by John Jennings and Damian Duffy (2018); reviewed here
  10. The Witch Doesn’t Burn in this One (Women are some kind of magic #2) by Amanda Lovelace (2018); reviewed here
  11. We Are Unprepared by Meg Little Reilly (2016)
  12. Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery (Incognegro Graphic Novels #1) by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece (2018); reviewed here
  13. In Real Life by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang (2014)
  14. Pestilence, Volume 1 by Frank Tieri, Mike Marts, and Oleg Okunev (2018); reviewed here
  15. Manfried the Man by Caitlin Major and Kelly Bastow (2018); reviewed here
  16. Archival Quality by Ivy Noelle Weir and Steenz (2018); reviewed here
  17. The Ravenous by Amy Lukavics (2017); reviewed here
  18. Sci-Fu by Yehudi Mercado (2018); reviewed here
  19. All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages edited by Saundra Mitchell (2018); reviewed here
  20. Bingo Love by Tee Franklin and Jenn St-Onge (2018); reviewed here
  21. War Mother by Fred Van Lente, Stephen Segovia, and Tomás Giorello (2018); reviewed here
  22. Pierce Brown’s Red Rising: Sons of Ares by Pierce Brown (2018); reviewed here
  23. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 1 by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith (2007); reviewed here
  24. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 2: Dark Days by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith (2007); reviewed here
  25. My Boyfriend Is a Bear by Pamela Ribon and Cat Farris (2018); reviewed here *
  26. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 3: Return to Barrow by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith (2004); reviewed here
  27. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 7: Eben and Stella by Steve Niles, Kelly Sue DeConnick, and Justin Randall (2007); reviewed here
  28. Spectacle, Vol. 1 by Megan Rose Gedris (2018); reviewed here
  29. Petra by Marianna Coppo (2018); reviewed here
  30. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 9: Beyond Barrow by Steve Niles and Bill Sienkiewicz (2008); reviewed here
  31. Firebug by Johnnie Christmas and Tamra Bonvillain (2018); reviewed here
  32. Jessica Jones: Alias Omnibus by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos (2006)
  33. The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish (2017)
  34. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (2014) *
  35. Jessica Jones: The Pulse: The Complete Collection (The Pulse #1-3) by Brian Michael Bendis (2014); reviewed here
  36. Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism edited by Danielle Barnhart and Iris Mahan (2018); reviewed here
  37. Bald Knobber by Robert Sergel (2018); reviewed here
  38. The Ghost, The Owl by Franco and Sara Richard (2018); reviewed here
  39. Flocks by L. Nichols (2018); reviewed here
  40. Super Late Bloomer: My Early Days in Transition by Julia Kaye (2018); reviewed here
  41. Box of Bones #1 by Ayize Jama-Everett and John Jennings (2018); reviewed here
  42. Atar Gull by Fabien Nury and Brüno (2016); reviewed here
  43. Jessica Jones: Avenger by Brian Michael Bendis, et al. (2016); reviewed here
  44. Under Dogs by Andrius Burba (2018); reviewed here
  45. Modern Loss: Candid Conversation About Grief. Beginners Welcome. edited by Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner (2018)
  46. Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow (2016)
  47. Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood (1996)
  48. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli (2015)
  49. Puerto Rico Strong edited by Hazel Newlevant, Desiree Rodriguez, and Marco Lopez (2018); reviewed here
  50. Coyotes, Volume 1 by Sean Lewis and Caitlin Yarsky (2018); reviewed here
  51. Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson (2017); reviewed here
  52. Everything You Want Me to Be by Mindy Mejia (2017)
  53. All Good Children by Dayna Ingram (2016)
  54. I Really Didn’t Think This Through: Tales from My So-Called Adult Life by Beth Evans (2018); reviewed here
  55. Sweet Tooth: Deluxe Edition, Book One by Jeff Lemire, José Villarrubia, Michael Sheen, and Carlos M. Mangual (2015)
  56. Sweet Tooth: Deluxe Edition, Book Two by Jeff Lemire, José Villarrubia, and Carlos M. Mangual (2016)
  57. Sweet Tooth: Deluxe Edition, Book Three by Jeff Lemire, José Villarrubia, Carlos M. Mangual, and Matt Kindt (2016); reviewed here
  58. Only Human (Themis Files #3) by Sylvain Neuvel (2018); reviewed here
  59. We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (2017)
  60. Tell Me Lies by Carola Lovering (2018); reviewed here
  61. Mr. Mercedes (Bill Hodges Trilogy #1) by Stephen King (2014)
  62. Whose Bum? by Chris Tougas (2018); reviewed here
  63. The Secret Loves of Geeks edited by Hope Nicholson (2018); reviewed here
  64. Finders Keepers (Bill Hodges Trilogy #2) by Stephen King (2015)
  65. Lies My Girlfriend Told Me by Julie Anne Peters (2014)
  66. Down from the Mountain by Elizabeth Fixmer (2015); reviewed here
  67. Rockabilly/Psychobilly: An Art Anthology by Jamie Kendall (2018); reviewed here
  68. Please Don’t Grab My P#$$y by Julia Young and Matt Harkins (2018); reviewed here
  69. Scout’s Heaven by Bibi Dumon Tak (2018); reviewed here
  70. Zenobia by Morten Dürr and Lars Horneman (2018); reviewed here
  71. Sheets by Brenna Thummler (2018); reviewed here
  72. Open Earth by Sarah Mirk, Eva Cabrera, and Claudia Aguirre (2018); reviewed here
  73. All the Rage by Courtney Summers (2015)
  74. End of Watch (Bill Hodges Trilogy #3) by Stephen King (2016)
  75. Spectacle (Menagerie #2) by Rachel Vincent (2017); reviewed here
  76. Chimera: Book One – The Righteous and the Lost by Tyler Ellis (2018); reviewed here
  77. The Burning World (Warm Bodies #2) by Isaac Marion (2017); reviewed here
  78. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng (2014) *
  79. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick (2013); reviewed here *
  80. Sometimes I Lie by Alice Feeney (2018); reviewed here
  81. Hasib & The Queen of Serpents: A Thousand and One Nights Tale by David B. (2018); reviewed here
  82. If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo (2016)
  83. Luisa: Now and Then by Carole Maurel (2018); reviewed here
  84. I Am Alfonso Jones by Tony Medina, John Jennings, and Stacey Robinson (2017); reviewed here *
  85. SMASH: Trial by Fire by Chris A. Bolton and Kyle Bolton (2018); reviewed here
  86. Ark Land by Scott A. Ford (2018); reviewed here
  87. Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin (2016)
  88. The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo (2018); reviewed here *
  89. Any Man by Amber Tamblyn (2018); reviewed here *
  90. Quiver by Julia Watts (2018); reviewed here
  91. Sadie by Courtney Summers (2018); reviewed here
  92. Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly (2018); reviewed here
  93. Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline (2013) *
  94. The Shape of Water by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus (2018) *
  95. Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present by Harriet A. Washington (2007)
  96. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (2014)
  97. Grace and Fury (Untitled #1) by Tracy Banghart (2018); reviewed here
  98. Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart (2016); reviewed here
  99. The Broken Girls by Simone St. James (2018)
  100. Emotions Explained with Buff Dudes: Owlturd Comix by Andrew Tsyaston (2018); reviewed here
  101. Upgrade Soul by Ezra Claytan Daniels (2018); reviewed here *
  102. Someone I Used to Know by Patty Blount (2018); reviewed here
  103. The Summer That Melted Everything by Tiffany McDaniel (2016) *
  104. Before She Sleeps by Bina Shah (2018); reviewed here
  105. My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (2018); reviewed here
  106. The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèlí Clark (2018); reviewed here
  107. Daughters of Forgotten Light by Sean Grigsby (2018); reviewed here
  108. Room by Emma Donoghue (2010)
  109. The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish by Scott Koblish (2018); reviewed here
  110. Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill (2018); reviewed here
  111. Monsters of the Week: The Complete Critical Companion to The X-Files by Zack Handlen, Todd VanDerWerff, and Patrick Leger (2018); reviewed here
  112. Donald and the Golden Crayon by P. Shauers (2018); reviewed here
  113. Loading Penguin Hugs: Heartwarming Comics from Chibird by Jacqueline Chen (2018); reviewed here
  114. The Book of Onions: Comics to Make You Cry Laughing and Cry Crying by Jake Thompson (2018); reviewed here
  115. Lil’ Donnie Volume 1: Executive Privilege by Mike Norton (2018); reviewed here
  116. The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney (2017)
  117. Watersnakes by Antonio Sandoval (2018); reviewed here
  118. Slothilda: Living the Sloth Life by Dante Fabiero (2018); reviewed here
  119. Super Chill: A Year of Living Anxiously by Adam Ellis (2018); reviewed here
  120. How to Be Successful without Hurting Men’s Feelings: Non-threatening Leadership Strategies for Women by Sarah Cooper (2018); reviewed here
  121. Claw the System: Poems from the Cat Uprising by Francesco Marciuliano (2018); reviewed here
  122. Gwen the Rescue Hen by Leslie Crawford and Sonja Stangl (2018); reviewed here *
  123. To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel by Fred Fordham (adapter/Illustrator) and Harper Lee (2018); review coming soon
  124. Moon of the Crusted Snow by Waubgeshig Rice (2018); reviewed here
  125. Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall (2017) *
  126. The Boneless Mercies by April Genevieve Tucholke (2018)
  127. Yes, I’m Hot in This: The Hilarious Truth about Life in a Hijab by Huda Fahmy (2018); review coming soon *
  128. Sprig the Rescue Pig by Leslie Crawford and Sonja Stangl (2018); review coming soon *
  129. Book Love by Debbie Tung (2019); review coming soon
  130. A Suicide Bomber Sits in the Library by Jack Gantos and Dave McKean (2019)
  131. [Dis]Connected: Poems and Stories of Connection and Otherwise edited by by Michelle Halket (2018); review coming soon
  132. The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker (2019); review coming soon
  133. Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys Dayton (2018); review coming soon *

bonus list: miscellaneous

  1. The Year of the Introvert: A Journal of Daily Inspiration for the Inwardly Inclined by Michaela Chung (2018); reviewed here
  2. Sibley: Birds of Land, Sea, and Sky: 50 Postcards by David Allen Sibley (2018); reviewed here

(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-12-31

January 1st, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato