Review: Michelle Rivera’s The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book (2009)

January 3rd, 2010 12:01 pm by Kelly Garbato

The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book by Michelle Rivera (2009)

Review: The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book: Cruelty-Free Recipes for Canines by Michelle A. Rivera (2009); published by the Book Publishing Company in Summertown, Tennessee.

I had originally planned on recommending The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book as a cute lil’ stocking stuffer for the holiday season. Alas, December was a hectic month, and I never did get around to reviewing the book in time for Christmas – or even compiling a gift-giving guide, I might add! Instead, I shall suggest that you gift a copy of The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book to the dog guardian in your life this Valentine’s Day – because the dreaded V-Day is so much more delightful when celebrated with/for canines, don’t you think?

(Remember:

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Dog is Love!)

Dog is Love; Vegan Dogs, Doubly So!

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review from the publisher.)

The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book is a quick, easy read. Part cookbook, part nutritional primer, part lifestyle guide, the book is divided into several sections:

1. The Vegan Lifestyle briefly examines the reasons for and benefits of veganism for dogs (here called a “vegan lifestyle,” since dogs are not “vegans” in the ethical/moral/philosophical sense of the word). Throughout this chapter, Rivera offers anecdotes from several guardians of vegan dogs, detailing how and why they decided to transition their dog-kids to vegan diets. She also includes some basic information about canine nutritional needs.

Though Rivera did consult with veterinarians while writing The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book, the book is not intended as a comprehensive nutritional or health guide. Rather, it helps to provide encouragement and support to those parents who have already decided to transition their dog-kids to veganism. In this way, the dog parents profiled within these pages function as a sort of support group for those already on the path to canine veganism, instead of an impetus to begin the journey.

That said, if you’re still struggling to decide whether veganism is the right choice for you and your dog-kids, The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book isn’t for you. Instead, I recommend searching your local library for books on canine nutrition – and not, necessarily, books specific to veganism and dogs. (To the best of my knowledge, no such books exist. Publishers, are you listening? *wink*) I think you’ll find that most veterinarians, while generally opposed to vegetarian and vegan diets for dogs, will begrudgingly admit that such diets can be healthy, as long as they’re formulated with care and knowledge. For me, hearing these words from speciesist omni (nonhuman) animal medical and nutritional professionals is what ultimately compelled me to make the leap to homemade vegetarian and, eventually, vegan foods.

2. Hazardous and Safe Ingredients is as straightforward as can be. Here, Rivera offers information about which foods you should avoid giving your dog-kids, and why. She also gives a few suggestions for healthful and tasty foods.

3. Getting Started seems a rather odd chapter to me. In this section, Rivera introduces five staples – beans, rice, lentils, barley and oatmeal – along with suggestions on how to prepare and store these items for later use. Thus, she explains how to soak and cook each item (good), directing readers to store and freeze the extras in single-serving containers (not so much “bad” as it is puzzling). Preparing beans, rice and the like doesn’t strike me as a big enough inconvenience that I’d need to cook a huge batch at a time and waste valuable, energy-sucking freezer space to store the extras. Plus, these items on their own are just ingredients; they don’t constitute entire meals, so these frozen foods still require extra prep. I don’t see how this strategy is advantageous, that is, unless one cooks a new meal for one’s canine kids every day? In which case, dog bless ya!

By the by, my five dog-kids eat three small meals a day. Breakfast is dry kibble, while lunch and dinner are dry kibble mixed with a homemade “wet” food. In the end, I cook one large meal for them once every five to seven days. They usually finish each batch up within a week, and I store the leftovers in the fridge. Probably I spend a few hours cooking for them every week, treats excluded; most cook time isn’t even spent in the kitchen, as there’s a whole lot of slow cooking involved.

4. Biscuits begins the recipe portion of The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book. Here, we have four appetizers, if you will: Yeasted Gourmet Dog Treats; Basic Vegan Dog Biscuits; Bulldog Bulgar Biscuits; and Oatmeal and Parmesan Biscuits.

I’m actually a little surprised to see that I haven’t yet tried any of the biscuit recipes! I suppose this is because all the recipes involve patience and delayed gratification – an hour or so spent baking in a heated oven, and then another 12 hours drying and hardening in a cool(ing) oven or on the countertop – and neither my dogs kids nor I are particularly patient when it comes to food and treats.

5. Main Dishes features eight hearty dishes: Barking Barley and Wheat Surprise; Snoopy’s Great Pumpkin, Rice and Beans; Canine Cashew Casserole; Oats, Rice, Veggies and Lentils; Rover’s Risotto; Fruits, Veggies and Oats; German Shepherd’s Pie; and Chihuahua Chili sans Carne.

You might recall that, back in November, I featured Barking Barley and Wheat Surprise in these here pages:

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I also tried out the German Shepherd’s Pie several weeks ago:

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Both dishes were a big hit with the dogs. My husband even liked the German Shepherd’s Pie!

The theme in this section is flexibility. Many of these recipes are jumping-off points; readers are encouraged to experiment with different grains, fruits and veggies in order to create their own dishes. In particular, “Main Dishes” illustrates just how easy and enjoyable cooking for your dog-kids can be, given a little time, planning and creativity.

My only real complaint with this section is that many of the recipes call for store-bought, low-sodium, no-onion vegan gravy and vegetable stock. While vegan gravy and veggie stock are readily available in stores, finding versions that are both low in sodium and onion-free is, dare I say, impossible. Thus, recipes for each of these ingredients would have been greatly appreciated. Instead, I improvised and came up with low-sodium, onion-free versions of each myself. See: For Dogs & their Peoples: Low-Sodium, Onion-Free Gravy & Vegetable Broth / Soup Stock; the vegetable broth is more of a soup than a soup stock, but chances are that your dog-kids won’t know the difference.

6. Special Treats is the final grouping of recipes in The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book. Nom noms include Banana-Nut Crunch Bars; Apple Pupcakes; Bowser’s Birthday Cake; Pekingese Pumpkin Pops; Snickerpoodles; Cheese Dog Delights; Hound Dog Delights; Puppy Part Hors D’oeuvres; and Peanut Butter Banana Treats.

Of these, both the Snickerpoodles

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and Peanut Butter Banana Treats

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received ten paws up from the little ones. (That’s two paws per dog in a frenzied begging gesture.)

I’m also eagerly awaiting the next dog “holiday” so that I can make a cake for the little buggers. (Peedee and Rennie have adoption days coming up in March; hopefully the weather will be nice enough that we can hold their parties out on the patio. Carob frosting on the couch does not a happy mommy make!)

So, to summarize: The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book is just that – a simple, little book about vegan dogs for their parents and guardians. If you aren’t already inclined, it won’t convince you of the merits of a vegan diet for your dogs. But if you’re already on the path, it might help to make your journey a bit more enjoyable.

Next up: Vegan Dogs Steal Your Heart (and Covers!)?

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

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5 Responses to “Review: Michelle Rivera’s The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book (2009)”

  1. Vegan Dog's Life Says:

    There actually is a really great, free book on vegan dog nutrition here- http://www.vegandognutritionassociation.com/vegandogs.pdf

    :)

  2. Kelly G. Says:

    Thanks for the link, Molly! I noticed that the author recommends Jed Gillen’s Obligate Carnivore, which was republished in 2008 (didn’t know that!).

  3. A hen is a mink is a dog is a boy.* Also: site updates and intersectionality links! » V for Vegan: easyVegan.info Says:

    […] with The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book, the Book Publishing Company sent me a copy of Karen Davis’s Prisoned Chickens, Poisoned […]

  4. Michelle Rivera Says:

    I read with interest your wonderful critique of my book and I am delighted that you have tried the recipes for your own dogs. My dogs enjoyed the process of my making these delicious delicacies! I agree that a low sodium diet is much better and that making your own soup stocks and gravies are much better for your dog (and you) in order to avoid sodium. However, the publishers wanted me to stay true to the theme of the recipes being simple, and so I used store-bought ingredients in some places where homemade clearly would have been much better. Oh, and I only added the part about making some ahead and freezing the small portions for working slobs like me who are always looking for a shortcut in the kitchen!
    I love your blog and I appreciate your support of vegan lifestyles for everyone!

  5. Renee D Says:

    Hi Kelly,

    I ran across this blog as I was looking for one of the recipes to the book. I have the book at home but am out of town and it’s my dog’s birthday and wanted to make Bowser’s bday cake. By chance, could you send the recipe to me?

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