Archive: March 2017

tweets for 2017-03-30

Friday, March 31st, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-29

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-28

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

Book Review: A Crown of Wishes (The Star-Touched Queen #2) by Roshani Chokshi (2017)

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

This story left me heartbroken, but for all the wrong reasons…

three out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for rape.)

“Find the one who glows, with blood on the lips and fangs in the heart.”

DNF at 60%.

When we first revisit Gauri, the Princess of Bharata – and the scrappy, story-hungry younger sister of Maya, the Star-Touched Queen of the series’ title – it’s from behind the bars of a dark, dank dungeon. Jealous of the devotion Gauri inspires in their people (and no doubt smarting from an assassination plot), her older brother Skanda arranged for her execution at enemy hands. Lucky for her (or is it really? Gauri is no distressed damsel), the Fox Prince needs Gauri alive.

The adopted only son of the the Emperor Pururavas, Vikram’s pending power is in name only: The Council of Ujijain refuses to let an orphan of common blood rule their land. Announcing Gauri’s execution is to be his first official act. But to kill the Jewel of Bharata is to turn his back on his one chance at true power. Vikram’s invitation to compete in the mythical Tournament Of Wishes is for two: himself and a partner who glows. And when he first sets his eyes on Gauri, she is positively luminescent.

With a little persuading – after what happened to Maya, Gauri wants nothing to do with magic – the two set off for the Otherworld, in pursuit of victory … and their most treasured wishes.

(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2017-03-27

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-26

Monday, March 27th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-25

Sunday, March 26th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-24

Saturday, March 25th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-23

Friday, March 24th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-22

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-21

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-20

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017
  • RT @FeralCrone: 4yo son said the word prototype. When I asked him what it meant, he said "People are a prototype" and I was too scared to a… ->
  • RT @diancalondon: "If you are silent about your pain, they'll kill you and say you enjoyed it." – Zora Neale Hurston #WomensHistoryMonth #r->
  • RT @ShaunKing: Guards in this Florida prison boiled #DarrenRainey to death.

    NONE OF THEM will be held accountable or even fired.

    https://… ->

  • RT @bettinajudd: Just saw someone refer to Trump supporters as Cult45 and I am mad that I never thought of it. ->

tweets for 2017-03-18

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

tweets for 2017-03-17

Saturday, March 18th, 2017
  • RT @mrjaycoles: “The Hate U Give” and The Reviews I Hate. – ***DISCLAIMER: I saw a lot of the reviews mentioned weeks ago,… https://t.co/… ->

tweets for 2017-03-16

Friday, March 17th, 2017
  • RT @HopeJahren: And they are meant to send a message: that this administration has the power to withhold the food that goes into your mouth… ->
  • RT @HopeJahren: They are an attack on the culture of sharing. An attack on the culture of curiosity. An attack on the culture of caretaking… ->
  • RT @HopeJahren: Trump's budget cuts are not financially motivated; they free up relatively small amounts of $. Instead, they are an attack… ->
  • RT @Fusion: The diverse America Donald Trump hates has handed him one of his most humiliating defeats: https://t.co/M5Y2ruigUY https://t.co… ->
  • RT @CiteSomething: Giveaway! ARC of THE GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO VICE AND VIRTUE. RT & follow to enter by 3/20 9 pm (CT). 1 follower will win.… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2017-03-15

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

Book Review: The Fall of Lisa Bellow, Susan Perabo (2017)

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

An insightful and sometimes uncanny story about relationships, trauma, and the darkest corners of our secret selves.

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for rape.)

There were still little green ribbons covering Lisa’s locker, but every morning some would have fallen down overnight, scattered like tiny leaves, and she would pick them up and toss them into the bottom of her own locker. How long would they let that locker, 64C, sit there, unused? How long did missing-person ribbons stay up? Was there an expiration date, some point where they officially became irrelevant, a day when the fall of Lisa Bellow became the winter of someone else, as Evan had predicted from the start?

“You’re popular,” Jules said. “I can’t believe it. Of all of us, I didn’t think it would be you first.”

Maybe they were all bitches, Claire thought. Maybe that was all there was to be in eighth grade. Maybe you didn’t have any choice. Maybe your only choice was figuring out what kind of bitch you wanted to be.

One crisp October afternoon, thirteen-year-old Meredith Oliver stops by the Deli Barn on the way home from school, to treat herself to a root beer soda for a job well done on her algebra test. Ahead of her in line stands her arch nemesis, Parkway North Middle School’s resident Mean Girl, Lisa Bellow. Her presence so unnerves Meredith that she almost turned tail and ran – that is, until Lisa caught her eye through the door. She couldn’t show Lisa any weakness, not with so much at stake.

As the sandwich farmer* is taking Lisa’s order (overly complicated, natch), a masked man strides in and robs the cashier at gunpoint. He forces Meredith and Lisa to lay down on the sticky floor of the restaurant while he walks the cashier to the back of the store, in search of a safe that doesn’t exist. When he comes back – alone – he forces Lisa to her feet and leaves with her. Traumatized, Meredith stays on the floor for another eleven minutes (“eleven glorious minutes”), until another customer walks in and find her. Even then, it takes a group of paramedics and “a needle full of Thorazine to peel her from her cherished spot.”

The Fall of Lisa Bellow is a strange and wonderful book. It’s about how Meredith copes with the trauma of the robbery and kidnapping, yes; but hers is not the only trauma we bear witness to. Meredith’s mother, Claire; her seventeen-year-old brother Ethan; Lisa’s mother Colleen; and Lisa’s friends Becca, Abby, and Amanda – all of them are working through their own “stuff,” not all of it related to Lisa’s disappearance. Yet the ripples of her kidnapping and likely murder reverberate through all their lives.

(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2017-03-14

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017
  • RT @Benjaminoftomes: 🔥RT & follow @oftomes for one winner to win this pile of #Oftomes books! 🔥
    It's international & ends March 31st!
    📖 go… ->
  • RT @CiteSomething: Giveaway! ARC of THE GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO VICE AND VIRTUE. RT & follow to enter by 3/20 9 pm (CT). 1 follower will win.… ->
  • Urge the Lancaster Event Center and Sesostris Shrine to Go Animal- Free! https://t.co/uUaHDr8H2B ->

tweets for 2017-03-13

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

Mini-Review: Nightlights, Lorena Alvarez (2017)

Monday, March 13th, 2017

Lorena Alvarez’s Artwork Positively Shines!

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through Edelweiss.)

Atoms are the smallest building blocks of matter. We are not able to see them with the naked eye … but everything that surrounds up is made of atoms. The stars … our bodies … the entire universe. They combine in millions of ways to create all the things we see and touch … and all the things we haven’t seen yet.

— 4.5 stars —

Every night when she closes her eyes, shiny little bubbles (stars? bursts of light and energy and joy?) appear over Sandy’s bed. When she catches them, she’s transported to another place: one filled with vibrant colors; giant, wide-eyed creatures; and funky plants of every shade and hue. In the morning, she fills her room with drawings of these other worlds (occasionally neglecting her homework to do so. Oops!)

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One day Sandy meets a mysterious new girl in the schoolyard: tale, pale to the point of translucence, with light purple hair. (Surely the nuns would have something to say about that?) Morfie is at first a welcome distraction; whereas the other kids think Sandy’s kind of weird, Morfie fawns over her artwork. But things take a sinister turn when Morfie begins to visit Sandy at inopportune times, and a nefarious, razor-toothed demon-child haunts Sandy’s dream-world.

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This sounds maybe a little scarier than it actually is. While Lorena Alvarez’s illustrations do pack a bit of a bite, they’re also lovely and whimsical and full of color and life. The target audience for Nightlights is ages nine and up, but adults are sure to be won over by the artwork. Some of the pages are suitable for framing, okay.

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As for the moral of the story, I’m not entirely sure I got it. In Morfie, I think there’s a message about following your passion because you love it, and not for the praise and awards and external feedback you hope to get from others. Staying true to yourself, because yours is the opinion that counts. It’s also important to strike a balance between work and play, responsibilities and extracurricular activities, science and the arts. And if you know why things are, it only makes them more wondrous.

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I also love the diversity here: from the students to the parents to the nuns/teachers, there are girls and women of all skin tones, shapes, and sizes. Lorena Alvarez was born in Bogotá, and the story definitely feels like it could be set in Columbia.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

 

Comments (May contain spoilers!)

Diversity: Yes! See my review for more.

Animal-friendly elements: n/a