Archive: February 2018

tweets for 2018-02-27

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018

Mini-Review: Petra by Marianna Coppo (2018)

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

#Petra2020

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review through LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers program.)

Petra is a giant, magnificent boulder: home to villages, witness to millennia of evolution, immobile and indestructible.

Or is she an egg, temporary protector of a fire-breathing dragon or a dapper baby penguin?

Or perhaps she is an island, a lush tropical paradise unto herself?

Maybe she’s all of the above, at various points in her life, to different people?

Petra is a sweet, whimsical, and empowering picture book about self-identity and discovery. The smiley little rock known as Petra is forever in the process of becoming, learning new and wonderful things about herself. She rolls with the punches, always looking on the bright side of things:

What will I be tomorrow?
Who knows?
Well, no need to worry.
I’m a rock, and this is how I roll.

Coppo’s illustrations are just the right mix of silly and sweet. If I stumbled upon Petra while out hiking, I’d bring her home too.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2018-02-26

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-25

Monday, February 26th, 2018
  • RT @dog_rates: This is Oliver. He was wondering if maybe you’d like to watch a movie with him. Says it can be scary as long as you’re puppa… ->
  • RT @hattedhedgehog: Googly eyes add so much to dinosaur history https://t.co/lgsyyfJQtl ->
  • RT @nancywyuen: #WakandaSalute in a traditional Chinese coat. I seriously never wear it for fear getting stereotyped as a foreigner. But I… ->
  • RT @mattmfm: Unbelievable: the Trump campaign just sent out an email using the Parkland shooting, including photos of survivors, to raise m… ->
  • RT @soledadobrien: Japanese internment (1942). The forced relocation of Native Americans under the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The West VA… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-02-24

Sunday, February 25th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-23

Saturday, February 24th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-22

Friday, February 23rd, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-21

Thursday, February 22nd, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-20

Wednesday, February 21st, 2018
  • RT @Marvel: "Marvel's Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur" animated series is in the works! Get the details on https://t.co/2gXkrpswTj: https://t.… ->
  • RT @chrissyteigen: Mister Rogers would narrate himself feeding the fish each episode with “I’m feeding the fish” because of a letter he rec… ->
  • RT @netflix: Tiffany Haddish will star in "Tuca & Bertie," Netflix's new animated series from the team behind "BoJack Horseman" https://t.c… ->
  • RT @shannonrwatts: “Mrs. Schimmoeller, we talked about it. If anything happens, we are going to carry you.”
    THIS is the burden our lawmake… ->
  • RT @DanielleWenner: Male privilege is making a booth demanding that others come teach you something rather than making an effort to go lear… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

Book Review: Black Comix Returns by John Jennings and Damian Duffy (2018)

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018

Meet your new TBR list!

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through Edelweiss.)

New to the world of comic books? Want to diversify your reading list? Looking for some STUNNING art by African-American creators? You’ve come to the right place: Black Comix Returns is collection of illustrations, comic strips, and essays by black artists.

Tbh, when I cracked this open, I was expecting to find an anthology of sorts, maybe a sampling of stories from up-and-and coming graphic novelists. This is almost as good, though: while we only get the briefest glimpse into the imaginations of each of the ninety-three artists featured in these here pages, nearly every two-page spread will leave you wanting more. Many of the illustrations are simply breathtaking, and the series descriptions had me adding titles to my Amazon wishlist like it was going out of style. The cover, easily one of the most jaw-dropping I’ve ever seen, is just a taste of the visual delights you can expect to find inside.

Additionally, the essays interspersed throughout give an added layer of context, exploring what it’s like to be an artist – and fan – in an overwhelmingly white (male) industry. Black Comix Returns isn’t necessarily the sort of book you read cover-to-cover, but do yourself a favor and make sure you hit all the essays.

I read Black Comix Returns as a pdf, but I’m sure it makes one helluva coffee table book. According to its Goodreads listing, the first title – Black Comix, which has since gone out of print – is somewhat of a collector’s item on ebay. The $29.99 list price of Black Comix Returns seems like a steal in comparison.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2018-02-19

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-18

Monday, February 19th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-17

Sunday, February 18th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-16

Saturday, February 17th, 2018

tweets for 2018-02-15

Friday, February 16th, 2018
  • RT @AriBerman: 33,000 gun deaths a year: let's make it easier to buy guns!
    31 cases of voter impersonation since 2000… ->
  • RT @summerbrennan: just so we're clear, a MAGA hat is the klan hood of the 21st century ->
  • RT @SelineSigil9: This copy of Alice in Wonderland was posted on Reddit, due to water damage it's grown spores and has actual mushrooms gro… ->
  • RT @dog_rates: This is Jacob. In June of 2016, he comforted those affected by the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando. Four months ago he f… ->
  • @AmbetterMO You guys really shouldn't send out the rewards cards before your system is equipped to handle them. I'v… https://t.co/rG4St1eIg9 ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-02-14

Thursday, February 15th, 2018

Book Review: Bingo Love by Tee Franklin & Jenn St-Onge (2018)

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

Pretty much the perfect Valentine’s Day read!

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I receive a free e-ARC for review through Edelweiss.)

Hazel and Mari met at a church bingo game in 1963. The girls became fast friends and, four years later, their friendship blossomed into something more. Before they’d had a chance to exchange even a handful of kisses, though, their secret was discovered, and the girls were forcibly separated by their families. Mari was sent to live down South, and both girls were forced to marry men chosen for them by their relatives.

Forty-eight years, eight children, and many grandchildren later, another chance meeting reunites the star-crossed lovers, giving each of them a second shot at happiness.

Bingo Love is such an achingly sweet and beautiful story, and I kind of love that its major imprint release is on Valentine’s Day. It made me laugh and cry – sometimes at the same time – and I’m not ashamed to say that the ending had me ugly crying onto my cat. The conclusion loops back into the beginning in a way that’s pure magic. (I actually had an a-hah! lightbulb moment when I realized what Franklin had done.)

The art is fantastically gorgeous, too: the colors, the outfits, the different styles of the times. Hazel and Mari are both fabulous AF: Hazel, with her oversized Iris Apfel glasses; Mari, with that bitchin’, DGAF white streak in her hair. This book oozes style, and it’s only fitting that Hazel takes the fashion world by storm for her second act.

Really my only complaint is that the dialogue sometimes feels stilted; unnatural, even … but don’t let this stop you from falling in love with the world Franklin and St-Onge built here. Bingo Love is a story that’s positively brimming with heart. Not to mention compassion and diversity. More, please.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2018-02-13

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

Book Review: Pestilence, Volume 1 by Frank Tieri and Oleg Okunev (2018)

Tuesday, February 13th, 2018

I’d almost rather have a zombie chew my nose off than read this again.

one out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for rape and misogyny. This review contains spoilers.)

DNF at 75%.

The year is 1347, and the Black Death is sweeping through Eurasia. Sent to dispatch a rogue crusader in a distant kingdom, a regimen of the Church’s army known as the Fiat Lux is summoned to the Vatican to rescue the Pope. Instead they are unwittingly drawn into a vast conspiracy involving zombies, religious dogma, and Jesus and Lucifer.

On the surface, Pestilence is a pretty cool idea: what if the Black Plague was actually a zombie outbreak? The plot line is surprisingly boring, though, and I only really cared about one character, who’s killed off just as he becomes interesting.

Worse still is the dialogue. If I had a dollar for every time “cocksucker” or “cunt” makes an appearance, I could buy an entire case of Daiya cheese. (At the 5% case discount, yes, but still: that shit is expensive!) I don’t have a problem with swearing, but here it’s pathetically overdone, as if it was written by a couple of ten-year-old boys who just discovered the f-word. There’s also some pretty gratuitous female nudity [side eye], as well as a full-page pillage-and-rape panel that’s both wholly unnecessary and obnoxiously insensitive [lighting this book on fire].

(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-02-12

Tuesday, February 13th, 2018