Archive: September 2018

tweets for 2018-09-13

Friday, September 14th, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-12

Thursday, September 13th, 2018
  • RT @theblackdetour: A Black man was arrested for riding a bike without a bell on it in Seaside Heights, NJ.
    Full Story = https://t.co/9tNI->
  • Tell your member of Congress: Say NO to further funding for family separation and incarceration!… https://t.co/NMCN4eL90r ->
  • RT @NerdPyle: In case you were wondering, the racist charicature of Serena Willliams drawn by Mark Knight is strongly backed by his employe… ->
  • RT @AliStandish: The line of folks waiting to pick up foster dogs for the weekend so coastal shelters can evacuate here before #HurricanceF->
  • RT @dog_rates: This is Bucky. He just realized graduating means less shenanigans. He really likes shenanigans. Not ready to grow pup anymor… ->
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tweets for 2018-09-11

Wednesday, September 12th, 2018

Book Review: Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly (2018)

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018

Anger is a Gift

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for discussions of sexism and misogyny, including sexual assault.)

Ask yourself, why would a society deny girls and women, from cradle to grave, the right to feel, express, and leverage anger and be respected when we do? Anger has a bad rap, but it is actually one of the most hopeful and forward thinking of all of our emotions. It begets transformation, manifesting our passion and keeping us invested in the world. It is a rational and emotional response to trespass, violation, and moral disorder. It bridges the divide between what “is” and what “ought” to be, between a difficult past and an improved possibility. Anger warns us viscerally of violation, threat, and insult. By effectively severing anger from “good womanhood,” we choose to sever girls and women from the emotion that best protects us against danger and injustice.

Anger is usually about saying “no” in a world where women are conditioned to say almost anything but “no.”

Because the truth is that anger isn’t what gets in our way—it is our way. All we have to do is own it.

— 3.5 stars —

After nearly ten years of marriage, and more than fifteen years together, my husband suddenly and unexpectedly passed away last year – leaving me a widow at the ripe old age of thirty-eight. The grief and shock quickly gave way to anger; in the process of reconciling his estate, I discovered secrets he’d been hiding from me. These were like a steady drip-drip-drip of awfulness that continued to pummel me in the weeks and months following his death.

My aunt – one of the relatives who came out for an extended stay as part of “Kelly Duty,” and who had a front seat to the dumpster fire that my life had become – said something that will always stick with me, and not in a good way. She was reading some paranormal/urban fantasy book at the time, and apparently the MC was not a fan of anger. She proceeded to give me this long speech about how anger poisons you from the inside out, and the only way to move on is through forgiveness. I’m sure she meant well, but the whole thing came off as insensitive, clueless, even manipulative. (I’m already feeling powerless, like I have zero control over anything in my life; now I don’t even get to decide how I feel about things?) I was still in the thick of things then, with bad news coming at me on the daily. Even a year and a half on, I am absolutely seething with anger.

Anyway, I didn’t know quite how to answer her at the time – probably I didn’t even have the energy for a rebuttal, and just let it go – but today, I am highly tempted to send her a copy of Soraya Chemaly’s book (possibly in conjunction with Mark Oshiro’s Anger Is a Gift, from which I borrowed the title for this review). Except I can’t hardly afford it, which is the source of some of my anger. This isn’t unusual, either, as I’ve learned from reading Rage Becomes Her: poverty, powerlessness, and a lack of authority are all associated with unexpressed anger. My continued rumination? Also par for the course.

(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-09-10

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018
  • RT @Lin_Manuel: Gnight
    I'm casting a protection spell on you
    from the moment you get home
    through your nighttime ritual
    til you close your… ->
  • RT @sttepodcast: Day fourteen of our twenty days of Funko is this Beetlejuice Pop!
    Just follow @sttepodcast and RT this tweet to be in wit… ->
  • RT @BreeNewsome: Why is he required to obey her verbal command when she had no reason to be in his apt? It's more reasonable for him to ass… ->
  • RT @SheaErnshaw: 🎊🎊🎊 G I V E A W A Y 🖤🖤🖤
    I’m giving away a deluxe, limited edition copy of THE WICKED DEEP! 😱 Plus a set of 3 custom bookma… ->
  • #Kentucky is suffering today after fatal shooting. #POTUS, stop the bloodshed. #BackfireTrump https://t.co/fAJH40OBhJ ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-09-09

Monday, September 10th, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-08

Sunday, September 9th, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-07

Saturday, September 8th, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-06

Friday, September 7th, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-05

Thursday, September 6th, 2018

Book Review: Sadie by Courtney Summers (2018)

Wednesday, September 5th, 2018

Serial + The Girls, with a pinch of Vigilante = Sadie

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for violence against women and children, including rape.)

I’m going to kill a man.

I’m going to steal the light from his eyes. I want to watch it go out. You aren’t supposed to answer violence with more violence but sometimes I think violence is the only answer. It’s no less than he did to Mattie, so it’s no less than he deserves.

I don’t expect it to bring her back. It won’t bring her back.

It’s not about finding peace. There will never be peace.

I’m not under any illusions about how little of me will be left after I do this one thing. But imagine having to live every day knowing the person who killed your sister is breathing the air she can’t, filling his lungs with it, tasting its sweetness. Imagine him knowing the steady weight of the earth under his feet while her body is buried six feet below it.

This is the furthest I’ve been from anything that I know.

My eyes burn, and tears slip down my cheeks and I can’t even imagine how pathetic I look. Girl with a busted face, torn-up arm, begging for the opportunity to save other girls. Why do I have to beg for that?

Nineteen-year-old Sadie Hunter has had a pretty effed up life. Born to a young, single mom with multiple addictions (alcohol, cocaine, heroin) and a rotating roster of enabling boyfriends, Sadie grew up in a trailer park in the small, struggling town of Cold Creek, Colorado. (Population: eight hundred.) She developed a stutter at a young age, but her mother Claire never sought treatment; consequently, Sadie was bullied, isolated, and shamed for it, for most of her life.

Claire’s own mother, Irene, died of breast cancer when Claire was only nineteen herself; Sadie’s striking physical resemblance to Irene was just one of many reasons why Claire had trouble bonding with her daughter. Younger sister Mattie Southern (she got the matrilineal surname; Sadie did not – telling, that) arrived six years later, and Sadie tried her best to be Mattie’s mother and father. When Claire ran out on her and Mattie, Sadie dropped out of high school to support her family. She was only sixteen.

After two years of limping along, with no small support from May Beth Foster – manager of the trailer park and their deceased grandmother’s best friend – Mattie disappeared. Her body was found three days later in an apple orchard several miles outside of town. Nine months later, Sadie too goes missing; her car is found thousands of miles away, in a town called Farfield. When the local police write Sadie off as just another runaway, May Beth reaches out to West McCray, journalist and host of the podcast Always Out There, for help.

Told in the alternating perspectives of Sadie (as she tracks down her sister’s killer) and West (in the form of his investigative podcast, The Girls, as he retraces Sadie’s steps, now three months cold), we embark on a Serial-type mystery that’s also a biting interrogation of rape culture, class, and misogyny.

I mean, I guess you could shelve Sadie under “mystery,” but it’s so much more than that. In a way, it’s a mystery within a mystery: who killed Mattie, and what happened to Sadie? Sadie already knows the answer to the former, and it’s revealed probably halfway into the story. The bigger question is what became of Sadie when she reached the end of her journey – and this is a blank we readers are left to fill in ourselves. In this way, the ending is a tease, but also a blessing: realistically, Sadie’s fate was likely not a happy one. And yet, by leaving things as she does, Summers allows us to hope, to dream, to retain our faith in a flawed young woman who wanted nothing than to save other girls like herself.

Sadie is also stark and uncompromising look at rape culture, much in the vein of All the Rage. Summers’s writing is at once beautiful and cutting; she dissects all manner of sexist tropes and stereotypes, from the Manic Pixie Dream Girl to the idea that men are only truly capable of grasping women’s humanity when they have a daughter of their own to care about and fear for and worry over. (Claire’s confrontation with West? Pure cathartic bliss.)

Sadie, Mattie, Claire, May Beth, Marlee – Summers has populated Sadie with a cast of complex, nuanced women characters. Sadie rather reminds me of a more realistic version of Alex Craft, the protagonist in Mindy McGinnis’s The Female of the Species. (Let’s face it, we can’t all be cold and calculating feminist serial killers.) Her relationships with Mattie, Claire, and May Beth are fascinating in their messiness. I love how Summers challenges our assumptions by allowing various characters to offer their own versions of oft-told stories at the 11th hour, long after our own impressions of them have begun to harden.

If you’ve never read a Courtney Summers book, you owe it to yourself to correct that ASAP. My first was All the Rage (amazing!), and with Sadie she’s fast becoming a favorite author of mine. I wouldn’t quite call Sadie a rape revenge story, but it’s a pretty fine distinction, and if you “enjoy” that subgenre as much as I, Sadie is a good choice on this front too.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2018-09-04

Wednesday, September 5th, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-03

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Twenty-Eight Little Mags & Finnick Things

Monday, September 3rd, 2018

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Dear Mags & Finn,

The past who-knows-how-many years have sucked, but you guys make everything worth it. (Mags especially. Sorry Finn! We’re each others’ second choices and we both know it. I still love you though!) I hope you both make it to New York with me, and Rennie too of course, and live at least long enough to experience each season in the Northeast. It’ll be a big change, but we’ve got each other, and isn’t that the most important thing? Plus you’ll finally get to meet (and snub, lmao) your extended nonhuman family: Hash and Roxy, Diablo, Jack and Diane, and Laila and Shadow.

It’s been a rocky ride, but just know that I love you both so much. You’re gonna make me lonesome when you go.

Forever yours,

Mom

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(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-09-02

Monday, September 3rd, 2018

tweets for 2018-09-01

Sunday, September 2nd, 2018

tweets for 2018-08-31

Saturday, September 1st, 2018