tweets for 2019-01-02

January 3rd, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @IlhanMN: 23 years ago, from a refugee camp in Kenya, my father and I arrived at an airport in Washington DC.
    Today, we return to that… ->
  • RT @filmgloss: holy shit https://t.co/kwQ1MOyeO9 ->
  • RT @MuslimIQ: Here's America's racism & misogyny problem in a nutshell
    2 Black men walk into a Starbucks—mind their own business
    •Manager… ->
  • RT @MuslimIQ: He is Daniel Taylor & he’s been arrested.
    This video summarizes how men murder 1600 women/year in America:
    •Violent man atta… ->
  • RT @MuslimIQ: Hey @McDonalds this is in your St Petersburg, FL store:
    •Violent white man verbally & physically assaults a black female empl… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

2018 Book Memories Challenge

January 2nd, 2019 2:00 pm by Kelly Garbato


 

I don’t think this challenge is still technically a thing, but I enjoy it, so here we go! Caution: thar may be spoilers ahead.

P.S. Wasn’t Mags something? I sure am gonna miss photographing you with appropriately-named books, old gal. BFFs 5EVER.

 

  1. Wayward (Wayward Pines #2) by Blake Crouch (2013)

    “I think he’s trying to preserve our way of life.”
    “For who? Us or him?”

    A millennium without air or light pollution made for pitch-black skies. The stars didn’t just appear anymore. They exploded. Diamonds on black velvet. You couldn’t tear your eyes away.

  2. My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf (2012)

  3. The Last Town (Wayward Pines #3) by Blake Crouch (2014)

    “It’s strange,” Ethan said. “The world belongs to them now, but we still possess something they don’t have.”
    “What?”
    “Kindness. Decency. That’s what it is to be human. At our best at least.”
    Ben looked confused.
    “I think this abby is different,” Ethan said.
    “What do you mean?”
    “She has an intelligence, a gentleness I haven’t seen in any of the others. Maybe she has a family she wants to see again.”
    “We should shoot her and burn her with all the rest.”
    “And what would that accomplish? Feed our anger for a few minutes? What if we did the opposite? What if we sent her out into her world with a message about the species that once lived in this valley? I know it’s crazy, but I’m holding tight to the idea that a small act of kindness can have real resonance.”

    “The funny thing is, as bad as I am, I don’t have it in me to murder her husband. Is there a fate worse than being halfway evil?”

  4. Kim Reaper, Volume 1: Grim Beginnings (Kim Reaper #1-4) by Sarah Graley (2018)

  5. The New Hunger (Warm Bodies #1.5) by Isaac Marion (2015)

    Hours pass. Then his eyes remember how to focus, and the world sharpens. He thinks that he liked the world better before he could see it.

    It’s a strange feeling, being judged by a child. He’s seven years old; where the hell did he get a moral compass? Certainly not from his parents. Not even from her. She supposes there must be people in the world who stick to their principles, who always do the right thing, but they are few and far between, especially now. Where does a child get an idea as unnatural as goodness?

    Everyone living in these times knows the most important rule of conservation: if you have to kill someone, make sure they stay dead. It may be a losing battle, the math may be against the Living, but diligence in this one area will at least slow down the spread of the plague. Responsible murder is the new recycling.

    He finds a riot helmet and crams it down over his springy hair. “Halt!” he orders in cop-voice, and Nora smiles through a sudden rush of bittersweet sadness that takes her a moment to understand. She feels ashamed when she realizes it’s nostalgia. She has already begun missing him.

    Thirty-four miles north of the police station, a young girl who recently killed a young boy is watching beige houses flicker through the headlights of her family’s SUV. Her father’s eyes are tight on the road, her mother’s on everything around the road, pistol at the ready should anything incongruous emerge from this idyllic suburban scene. They are traveling later than they usually do, later than is safe, and the girl is glad. She hates sleeping. Not just because of the nightmares, but because everything is urgent. Because life is short. Because she feels a thousand fractures running through her, and she knows they run through the world. She is racing to find the glue.
    Thirty-four miles south of this girl, a man who recently learned he is a monster is following two other monsters up a steep hill in an empty city, because he can smell life in the distance and his purpose now is to take it. A brutish thing inside him is giggling and slavering and clutching its many hands in anticipation, overjoyed to finally be obeyed, but the man himself feels none of this. Only a coldness deep in his chest, in the organ that once pumped blood and feeling and now pumps nothing. A dull ache like a severed stump numbed in ice – what was there is gone, but it hurts. It still hurts.
    And three hundred feet north of these monsters are a girl and boy who are looking for new parents. Or perhaps becoming them. Both are strong, both are super smart and super cool, and both are tiny and alone in a vast, merciless, endlessly hungry world.
    All six are moving toward each other, some by accident, some by intent, and though their goals differ considerably, on this particular summer night, under this particular set of cold stars, all of them are sharing the same thought:
    Find people.

    (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2019-01-01

January 2nd, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

fuck yeah reading: 2018 books

January 1st, 2019 9:00 am by Kelly Garbato

null

This year was a dumpster fire, both personally and politically/locally and globally/for reasons both obvious and not yet stated. Somehow I still found time to read a whopping 133 books, impressive even when you remove the kids’ 34-pagers from the equation. (There weren’t too many, and some were downright essential to my mental health, so.)

I set a pretty modest goal of one book a week and blew it out of the water, as illustrated by this bootyful Goodreads chart.

null
null
null
null
null
nullnull

(Low expectations, they are a lifesaver.)

My favorites are starred, but if you check out just a handful of my picks, may I suggest My Boyfriend is a Bear, Any Man, and/or Leslie Crawford and Sonja Stangl’s picture books about farmed animals who saved themselves? Pure joy there, folks.

P.S. I cheated on the cover gallery and left in some books that I received for review in 2018 but never quite got around to reading. They just looked so darn pretty there, and this way y’all have a preview of what I’ll be doing in the days and weeks to come. See if you can spot the extras for bonus points!

 

fuck yeah reading: 2018 book list

  1. Wayward (Wayward Pines #2) by Blake Crouch (2013)
  2. My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf (2012)
  3. The Last Town (Wayward Pines #3) by Blake Crouch (2014)
  4. Kim Reaper, Volume 1: Grim Beginnings (Kim Reaper #1-4) by Sarah Graley (2018); reviewed here
  5. The New Hunger (Warm Bodies #1.5) by Isaac Marion (2015); reread: originally reviewed here *
  6. Grrl Scouts: Magic Socks by Jim Mahfood (2017); reviewed here
  7. The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang (2018); reviewed here *
  8. Black Genealogy: Poems (The Mineral Point Poetry Series, Volume 6) by Kiki Petrosino and Lauren Haldeman (2017); reviewed here
  9. Black Comix Returns edited by John Jennings and Damian Duffy (2018); reviewed here
  10. The Witch Doesn’t Burn in this One (Women are some kind of magic #2) by Amanda Lovelace (2018); reviewed here
  11. We Are Unprepared by Meg Little Reilly (2016)
  12. Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery (Incognegro Graphic Novels #1) by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece (2018); reviewed here
  13. In Real Life by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang (2014)
  14. Pestilence, Volume 1 by Frank Tieri, Mike Marts, and Oleg Okunev (2018); reviewed here
  15. Manfried the Man by Caitlin Major and Kelly Bastow (2018); reviewed here
  16. Archival Quality by Ivy Noelle Weir and Steenz (2018); reviewed here
  17. The Ravenous by Amy Lukavics (2017); reviewed here
  18. Sci-Fu by Yehudi Mercado (2018); reviewed here
  19. All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages edited by Saundra Mitchell (2018); reviewed here
  20. Bingo Love by Tee Franklin and Jenn St-Onge (2018); reviewed here
  21. War Mother by Fred Van Lente, Stephen Segovia, and Tomás Giorello (2018); reviewed here
  22. Pierce Brown’s Red Rising: Sons of Ares by Pierce Brown (2018); reviewed here
  23. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 1 by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith (2007); reviewed here
  24. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 2: Dark Days by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith (2007); reviewed here
  25. My Boyfriend Is a Bear by Pamela Ribon and Cat Farris (2018); reviewed here *
  26. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 3: Return to Barrow by Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith (2004); reviewed here
  27. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 7: Eben and Stella by Steve Niles, Kelly Sue DeConnick, and Justin Randall (2007); reviewed here
  28. Spectacle, Vol. 1 by Megan Rose Gedris (2018); reviewed here
  29. Petra by Marianna Coppo (2018); reviewed here
  30. 30 Days of Night, Vol. 9: Beyond Barrow by Steve Niles and Bill Sienkiewicz (2008); reviewed here
  31. Firebug by Johnnie Christmas and Tamra Bonvillain (2018); reviewed here
  32. Jessica Jones: Alias Omnibus by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos (2006)
  33. The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish (2017)
  34. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (2014) *
  35. Jessica Jones: The Pulse: The Complete Collection (The Pulse #1-3) by Brian Michael Bendis (2014); reviewed here
  36. Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism edited by Danielle Barnhart and Iris Mahan (2018); reviewed here
  37. Bald Knobber by Robert Sergel (2018); reviewed here
  38. The Ghost, The Owl by Franco and Sara Richard (2018); reviewed here
  39. Flocks by L. Nichols (2018); reviewed here
  40. Super Late Bloomer: My Early Days in Transition by Julia Kaye (2018); reviewed here
  41. Box of Bones #1 by Ayize Jama-Everett and John Jennings (2018); reviewed here
  42. Atar Gull by Fabien Nury and Brüno (2016); reviewed here
  43. Jessica Jones: Avenger by Brian Michael Bendis, et al. (2016); reviewed here
  44. Under Dogs by Andrius Burba (2018); reviewed here
  45. Modern Loss: Candid Conversation About Grief. Beginners Welcome. edited by Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner (2018)
  46. Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow (2016)
  47. Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood (1996)
  48. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli (2015)
  49. Puerto Rico Strong edited by Hazel Newlevant, Desiree Rodriguez, and Marco Lopez (2018); reviewed here
  50. Coyotes, Volume 1 by Sean Lewis and Caitlin Yarsky (2018); reviewed here
  51. Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson (2017); reviewed here
  52. Everything You Want Me to Be by Mindy Mejia (2017)
  53. All Good Children by Dayna Ingram (2016)
  54. I Really Didn’t Think This Through: Tales from My So-Called Adult Life by Beth Evans (2018); reviewed here
  55. Sweet Tooth: Deluxe Edition, Book One by Jeff Lemire, José Villarrubia, Michael Sheen, and Carlos M. Mangual (2015)
  56. Sweet Tooth: Deluxe Edition, Book Two by Jeff Lemire, José Villarrubia, and Carlos M. Mangual (2016)
  57. Sweet Tooth: Deluxe Edition, Book Three by Jeff Lemire, José Villarrubia, Carlos M. Mangual, and Matt Kindt (2016); reviewed here
  58. Only Human (Themis Files #3) by Sylvain Neuvel (2018); reviewed here
  59. We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (2017)
  60. Tell Me Lies by Carola Lovering (2018); reviewed here
  61. Mr. Mercedes (Bill Hodges Trilogy #1) by Stephen King (2014)
  62. Whose Bum? by Chris Tougas (2018); reviewed here
  63. The Secret Loves of Geeks edited by Hope Nicholson (2018); reviewed here
  64. Finders Keepers (Bill Hodges Trilogy #2) by Stephen King (2015)
  65. Lies My Girlfriend Told Me by Julie Anne Peters (2014)
  66. Down from the Mountain by Elizabeth Fixmer (2015); reviewed here
  67. Rockabilly/Psychobilly: An Art Anthology by Jamie Kendall (2018); reviewed here
  68. Please Don’t Grab My P#$$y by Julia Young and Matt Harkins (2018); reviewed here
  69. Scout’s Heaven by Bibi Dumon Tak (2018); reviewed here
  70. Zenobia by Morten Dürr and Lars Horneman (2018); reviewed here
  71. Sheets by Brenna Thummler (2018); reviewed here
  72. Open Earth by Sarah Mirk, Eva Cabrera, and Claudia Aguirre (2018); reviewed here
  73. All the Rage by Courtney Summers (2015)
  74. End of Watch (Bill Hodges Trilogy #3) by Stephen King (2016)
  75. Spectacle (Menagerie #2) by Rachel Vincent (2017); reviewed here
  76. Chimera: Book One – The Righteous and the Lost by Tyler Ellis (2018); reviewed here
  77. The Burning World (Warm Bodies #2) by Isaac Marion (2017); reviewed here
  78. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng (2014) *
  79. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick (2013); reviewed here *
  80. Sometimes I Lie by Alice Feeney (2018); reviewed here
  81. Hasib & The Queen of Serpents: A Thousand and One Nights Tale by David B. (2018); reviewed here
  82. If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo (2016)
  83. Luisa: Now and Then by Carole Maurel (2018); reviewed here
  84. I Am Alfonso Jones by Tony Medina, John Jennings, and Stacey Robinson (2017); reviewed here *
  85. SMASH: Trial by Fire by Chris A. Bolton and Kyle Bolton (2018); reviewed here
  86. Ark Land by Scott A. Ford (2018); reviewed here
  87. Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin (2016)
  88. The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo (2018); reviewed here *
  89. Any Man by Amber Tamblyn (2018); reviewed here *
  90. Quiver by Julia Watts (2018); reviewed here
  91. Sadie by Courtney Summers (2018); reviewed here
  92. Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly (2018); reviewed here
  93. Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline (2013) *
  94. The Shape of Water by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus (2018) *
  95. Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present by Harriet A. Washington (2007)
  96. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (2014)
  97. Grace and Fury (Untitled #1) by Tracy Banghart (2018); reviewed here
  98. Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart (2016); reviewed here
  99. The Broken Girls by Simone St. James (2018)
  100. Emotions Explained with Buff Dudes: Owlturd Comix by Andrew Tsyaston (2018); reviewed here
  101. Upgrade Soul by Ezra Claytan Daniels (2018); reviewed here *
  102. Someone I Used to Know by Patty Blount (2018); reviewed here
  103. The Summer That Melted Everything by Tiffany McDaniel (2016) *
  104. Before She Sleeps by Bina Shah (2018); reviewed here
  105. My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (2018); reviewed here
  106. The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèlí Clark (2018); reviewed here
  107. Daughters of Forgotten Light by Sean Grigsby (2018); reviewed here
  108. Room by Emma Donoghue (2010)
  109. The Many Deaths of Scott Koblish by Scott Koblish (2018); reviewed here
  110. Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill (2018); reviewed here
  111. Monsters of the Week: The Complete Critical Companion to The X-Files by Zack Handlen, Todd VanDerWerff, and Patrick Leger (2018); reviewed here
  112. Donald and the Golden Crayon by P. Shauers (2018); reviewed here
  113. Loading Penguin Hugs: Heartwarming Comics from Chibird by Jacqueline Chen (2018); reviewed here
  114. The Book of Onions: Comics to Make You Cry Laughing and Cry Crying by Jake Thompson (2018); reviewed here
  115. Lil’ Donnie Volume 1: Executive Privilege by Mike Norton (2018); reviewed here
  116. The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney (2017)
  117. Watersnakes by Antonio Sandoval (2018); reviewed here
  118. Slothilda: Living the Sloth Life by Dante Fabiero (2018); reviewed here
  119. Super Chill: A Year of Living Anxiously by Adam Ellis (2018); reviewed here
  120. How to Be Successful without Hurting Men’s Feelings: Non-threatening Leadership Strategies for Women by Sarah Cooper (2018); reviewed here
  121. Claw the System: Poems from the Cat Uprising by Francesco Marciuliano (2018); reviewed here
  122. Gwen the Rescue Hen by Leslie Crawford and Sonja Stangl (2018); reviewed here *
  123. To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel by Fred Fordham (adapter/Illustrator) and Harper Lee (2018); review coming soon
  124. Moon of the Crusted Snow by Waubgeshig Rice (2018); reviewed here
  125. Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall (2017) *
  126. The Boneless Mercies by April Genevieve Tucholke (2018)
  127. Yes, I’m Hot in This: The Hilarious Truth about Life in a Hijab by Huda Fahmy (2018); review coming soon *
  128. Sprig the Rescue Pig by Leslie Crawford and Sonja Stangl (2018); review coming soon *
  129. Book Love by Debbie Tung (2019); review coming soon
  130. A Suicide Bomber Sits in the Library by Jack Gantos and Dave McKean (2019)
  131. [Dis]Connected: Poems and Stories of Connection and Otherwise edited by by Michelle Halket (2018); review coming soon
  132. The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker (2019); review coming soon
  133. Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys Dayton (2018); review coming soon *

bonus list: miscellaneous

  1. The Year of the Introvert: A Journal of Daily Inspiration for the Inwardly Inclined by Michaela Chung (2018); reviewed here
  2. Sibley: Birds of Land, Sea, and Sky: 50 Postcards by David Allen Sibley (2018); reviewed here

(More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-12-31

January 1st, 2019 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-30

December 31st, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-29

December 30th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-28

December 29th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

Book Review: Moon of the Crusted Snow by Waubgeshig Rice (2018)

December 28th, 2018 7:00 am by Kelly Garbato

The end comes not with a bang, but with a whimper.

three out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through Edelweiss. Trigger warning for allusions to rape. THIS REVIEW CONTAINS SPOILERS.)

— 2.5 stars —

“You know, when young people come over, sometimes some of them talk about the end of the world,” Aileen said, breaking the silence and snapping Evan out of his woolgathering. He looked up from the plaid pattern on the vinyl tablecloth to the old woman’s face.

“They say that this is the end of the world. The power’s out and we’ve run out of gas and no one’s come up from down south. They say the food is running out and that we’re in danger. There’s a word they say too — ah . . . pock . . . ah . . .”

“Apocalypse?”

“Yes, apocalypse! What a silly word. I can tell you there’s no word like that in Ojibwe. Well, I never heard a word like that from my elders anyway.”

Evan nodded, giving the elder his full attention.

“The world isn’t ending,” she went on. “Our world isn’t ending. It already ended. It ended when the Zhaagnaash came into our original home down south on that bay and took it from us. That was our world.”

Moon of the Crusted Snow starts out with a promising premise: how would the apocalypse play out on a remote Anishinaabe reservation in Canada, where food scarcity is common, connection to the grid is new and sometimes unreliable, and communication with the rest of the world is reliant on technology? Where the winter is long and punishing, especially without modern conveniences like electric heat and grocery stores? Throw in a migratory stream of white refugees looking to escape a failed society on land to which they’d previously banished this continent’s original habitants, and I’m in.

The result is actually kind of dull. The end of the world comes slowly, indeed. Told from the perspective of Evan Whitesky, a youngish father and employee of public works, the story unravels gradually, as the rez first loses satellite service (read: internet and tv), followed by cell service, satellite phones, and finally the power. Two of the nation’s young men, attending college in Gibson, return with eerie tales of a city abandoned. Then a stranger named Justin Scott, a sketchy paramilitary type, follows, effectively dividing the reservation into two camps.

This should be where the tension heightens – but really, most of the societal breakdown we see is of the bureaucratic variety. When people inevitably start freezing to death in the streets – and, later, their homes – I started to think that Scott’s ulterior motives would be unveiled…but no. The final reveal is, well, weird. Scott and his adherents are stealing bodies from the makeshift morgue and feasting on the dead. It’s almost presented in a way that…suggests the Anishinaabe are the only cultures in which cannibalism is taboo? Like Scott tricked his hapless followers into violating this sacred Anishinaabe code or something? But, like, white people aren’t rushing to eat human flesh either. That’s why movies like Alive hold such a curious fascination. Unless I’ve got it all wrong, and the cannibalism is just code for laziness, or taking the easy way out, in which case, sure. White privilege at its basest.

Either way, I almost DNF’ed it multiple times. But because I hate giving bad reviews, let me end on a positive note: Rice’s narrative provides a much-needed insight into reservation life.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2018-12-27

December 28th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-26

December 27th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-25

December 26th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

Book Review: Loading Penguin Hugs: Heartwarming Comics from Chibird by Jacqueline Chen (2018)

December 25th, 2018 7:00 am by Kelly Garbato

Just what I needed.

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through Edelweiss.)

Filled with uplifting and inspirational illustrations from Jacqueline Chen’s tumblr chibird, Loading Penguin Hugs is like a nose bump from a happy dog, or a warm cup of tea on a rainy fall afternoon. It’s sweet, adorable, and positive AF: basically a great friend to turn to when you’re feeling down. Let positive bunny, motivational penguin, happy ghost, and the positive puppers make you feel a teensy bit better about this trash fire called life.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

tweets for 2018-12-24

December 25th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-23

December 24th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @emrazz: Women who dedicate their lives to harassing men are a rarity. Men who dedicate their lives to harassing women are commonplace.… ->
  • RT @UnleashedRescue: Tomorrow is Christmas Eve!
    And all of our fur babies are tucked in to get plenty of sleep for their big day!
    In hop… ->
  • RT @longwall26: My cat, an idiot: Those ornaments look exactly like my toys. Why can’t I play with them?
    Me, pinnacle of animals: That fel… ->
  • RT @danarel: “No” https://t.co/myVgZKcAgH ->
  • RT @sttepodcast: Day ten of our twenty days of Funko is this Ron Swanson Pop!
    Just follow @sttepodcast and RT this tweet to be in with a… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-12-22

December 23rd, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-21

December 22nd, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato
  • RT @neal_katyal: Words fail me. The President is having conversations w/the Acting AG he installed (w/out Senate confirmation) about a crim… ->
  • RT @AZMIAakaMIA: If you have a moment to spare a RT, please share. The insurance company is still refusing to pay the $11,000 hospital bil… ->
  • RT @NoContextAds: Cathy hated driving the sex party van https://t.co/9iqFKpfG18 ->
  • RT @djsziff: People ask whether #MeToo has gone "too far," but then an anonymous "senior DOJ official" just gets to slink away and retire a… ->
  • RT @shaunking: Disgusting and heartbreaking. A referee known for his racism, Alan Maloney (google him), made high school wrestler Andrew Jo… ->
  • (More below the fold…)

tweets for 2018-12-20

December 21st, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-19

December 20th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato

tweets for 2018-12-18

December 19th, 2018 2:00 am by Kelly Garbato