The Lucky Ones by Woodstock FAS Founder Jenny Brown: Review & Giveaway!

Monday, June 24th, 2013

Update, July 1, 2013:

& the winner is (*drumroll please*) #8, Kenney!

Check your email to claim your prize!

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In anticipation of the upcoming July 2nd paperback release, Penguin generously provided me with two copies of The Lucky Ones: My Passionate Fight for Farm Animals, written by Woodstock FAS founder Jenny Brown and fellow vegan Gretchen Primack – one to review, and one to give away!

To enter to win a copy for your very own self, simply answer this question in the comments: if you could visit Woodstock tomorrow, which of the residents – human or non – would you most like to meet? (Hint: there’s a partial list available on Woodstock’s website.) Or just tell me why you need this book! I’m not fussy.

For a second entry, tweet this message and leave a second comment telling me you did so.

THE LUCKY ONES by @WoodstockFarm Founder Jenny Brown: #Review & #Giveaway! Enter to #win your own copy here: http://bit.ly/12PyHx8 #vegan

The contest is open now through Monday, July 1st at tPM CDT. I’ll randomly choose and contact a winner shortly thereafter. The winner will have 72 hours to respond, after which time I’ll choose someone else. Please leave an email address in the form when commenting (don’t worry, it’s private!) so we can get in touch. I’ll ship the book anywhere in the United States and Canada.

Good luck, and happy reading!

 

A Five-Hankie Review

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review at the publisher’s invitation.)

“I often envision a giant protective bubble over our property, and inside it a place where everything is right in the world, the way we want it to be. Animals roam free, living happy and peaceful lives the way they should. They are free to be themselves, among friends and, in some cases, family. There is no fear of harm, no want for food or water, warmth or shelter. They have everything they need. They are loved, and treated with respect and compassion, until their dying moments in our arms, when they are wet from our tears. We coexist with them, never considering ourselves superior or their ‘owners.’ We don’t use them as commodities or exploit them in any way. They are our friends. Beloved friends. They owe us nothing. But what they do give, unconsciously, is the greatest asset to our work. They are ambassadors for all others like them, showing humans that other animals are not mere automatons.” (pp. 223-224)

As a teenager slinging burgers at the Doublemeat Palace in Sunnydale – errr, serving burgers at a Louisville McDonald’s; sorry, I got my superheroes confused for a second there! – Jenny Brown never imagined that she’d one day devote her life to rescuing the very animals she enjoyed sandwiched between two slices of bread – let alone give up a promising career in film to do so.

Along with her husband, film editor Doug Abel, Brown founded Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in 2004; their wedding ceremony served as the nonprofit’s inaugural fundraiser. Located just outside of Woodstock, New York, in the neighboring town of Willow, Woodstock FAS is home to over 200 rescued “farm” animals, including runaway cow Kayli, who literally escaped death in a New York City “live kill” market when she bolted for it through the city streets; the infamous goat Albie who, like his guardian, sports one “fake” leg; and Petunia, a “Thanksgiving” turkey purchased as a gag. They are the lucky ones – a precious few of the ten billion animals enslaved and slaughtered for meat, dairy, and eggs every year in the United States alone (not counting fishes and associated “bycatch”) who are fortunate enough to find sanctuary with human allies.

(More below the fold…)