Book Review: Second Daughter (The Dharian Affairs, Book Two), Susan Kaye Quinn (2014)

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Fun & Action-Packed, with Just the Right Amount of K-I-S-S-I-N-G!

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-copy of this book for review from the author.)

When last we saw the Third Daughter of Dharia, she was on board the reclaimed skyship Prosperity, bound for Jungali with the “barbarian” prince Ash at her side. The two planned to wed – for love, not country – but their happy ending was somewhat overshadowed by the possibility that their former Samirian allies had build a second, undiscovered skyship, ominously named the Dagger. With one sister – the Second Daughter of Dharia, Seledri – married into the Samirian royal house, the prospect of war with Samir threatens to tear apart Princess Aniri’s family as well as her nation.

Second Daughter picks up where Third Daughter left off, with Aniri and Ash’s return to his (soon to be their) Jungali mountain palace, where preparations for the upcoming nuptials begin immediately. Though Dharia and Jungali are united by a peace treaty, a marriage will help to further cement the alliance – especially important in wartime. But with her return to relative normalcy, Aniri begins to distrust her heart, which led her horribly astray in past dalliances. Pre-wedding jitters left unspoken threaten to derail the wedding. And then comes word of a foiled assassination attempt on Seledri, giving Aniri ample reason to play the proverbial runaway bride.

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Book Review: Third Daughter (The Dharian Affairs, Book One), Susan Kaye Quinn (2013)

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Hella Fun!

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic copy of this book for review through Library Thing’s Member Giveaways program.)

As the Third Daughter of Dharia, Aniri enjoys a luxury which was denied her older sisters: on her 18th birthday, she’s free to marry for love instead of country. First in the line of succession, Aniri’s oldest sister Nahali has been groomed from birth to become Queen; fittingly, she arranged to marry a Dharian nobleman (whom she just so happened to love). Meanwhile, middle sister Seledri married a Samirian prince in order to further the alliance between her country and his (sadly, the prince’s love for Seledri is as of yet unrequited).

With no interests left to further, Aniri happily awaits the day when she’ll be able to marry her lover Devesh, a courtesan and fencing instructor from Samir. Then they will travel the world in search of the Samirian robbers who murdered her father the King some eight years ago.

Naturally, a wrench finds its way into Aniri’s plans – in the form of Ashoka Malik, the barbarian prince of Jungali. After the untimely deaths of his mother and younger brother, Prince Malik – “Ash” to his friends – finds himself in charge of a fractured country. Comprised of four provinces, the mountain country is mired in poverty and fraught with infighting, particularly as at least one of the provinces’ generals play at a military coup. Rumors of a Jungali flying machine run rampant, and war seems inevitable. Hoping that his marriage to a Dharian Prince will cultivate a powerful alliance and unite his people behind him, Prince Malik proposes a peace-brokering marriage to the Queen. Unfortunately for Aniri, she is the only single daughter left.

And that’s just the first few chapters! (I won’t say more because I’d rather not spoil the story, but suffice it to say that nothing is as it seems.)

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