Book Review: Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, Monique W. Morris (2016)

Monday, March 28th, 2016

Because Black Girls Matter

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through Edelweiss. Trigger warning for discussions of racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, sexual harassment, rape, and sexual trafficking.)

Born into a cultural legacy of slavery, Black American women have interpreted defiance as something that is not inherently bad. Harriet Tubman was defiant.

Michael Brown. Eric Garner. John Crawford III. Ezell Ford. Dante Parker. Tony Robinson. Akai Gurley. Walter Scott. Freddie Gray. Tamir Rice.

While the seemingly never-ending stream of tragedies involving the murder of unarmed black men and boys at the hands of law enforcement has focused media attention on the issues of police brutality, the militarization of local police forces, mass incarceration, the school-to-prison pipeline, and systemic racism, too often women and girls are excluded from the discussion. However, intersectional feminist and anti-racist activists aim to center the experiences of black women, who must contend with both race- and gender-based oppression. Thanks to initiatives like #SayHerName and #BlackGirlsMatter, the names of Rekia Boyd, Sandra Bland, and Tarika Wilson will not be lost to history.

While writing Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, Monique W. Morris spent four years researching race and gender disparities in our educational system – and engaging with the girls and women directly impacted: namely, young women in New Orleans, Chicago, New York, Boston, and Northern and Southern California. The result is a book that’s as heartbreaking as it is informative.

Though she uses several high-profile cases – such as the assault of fifteen-year-old, bikini-clad Dajerria Becton at the hands of McKinney, Texas cop Eric Casebolt, and the handcuffing of six-year-old Floridian Desre’e Watson for throwing a tantrum in class – as jumping-off points, Morris looks beyond the most egregious examples of excessive force. She delves deeper, exploring how the proliferation of “zero tolerance” policies in the ’90s, the presence of police or “student resource officers” (SROs) in schools, and the criminalization of minor or nonviolent offenses – including behaviors that aren’t even against the law, such as “talking back” or violating a school’s dress code – create a hostile educational environment, especially for black girls.

(More below the fold…)

Book Review: Teaching with Harry Potter: Essays on Classroom Wizardry from Elementary School to College, Valerie Estelle Frankel, ed. (2013)

Monday, July 29th, 2013

Something for Everyone!

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review at the editor’s invitation.)

Since the debut of Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone in 1997, the Harry Potter franchise has generated a wealth of scholarly research. “Aca-fans” – “those who participate in academic fandom” (page 1) – scrutinize, interrogate, and critique Harry Potter creations both official and unauthorized: from J.K. Rowling’s novels to the film adaptations and supporting websites, to fan-made works such as fan and slash fiction – all is fair game. Such discussions often focus on themes as diverse as literature, philosophy, psychology, history, gender studies, and the law. However, Harry Potter’s place in education is a topic that has, until now, been all but neglected – as some of the writers (most notably Elisabeth C. Gumnior, who devotes an entire chapter to the subject) in Teaching with Harry Potter: Essays on Classroom Wizardry from Elementary School to College are quick to point out.

The eighteen authors who contributed to this unique collection come from a variety of backgrounds; they are parents, teachers of middle and high school students, college professors, academics, and fans. Consequently, there’s a little something for everyone here. Common to the essays is a shared enthusiasm for Harry Potter and his ability to help educate the next generation. Composition, literature, creative writing, romance languages, medieval studies, modern history, theology, science: with a little creativity and effort, the lessons found in Harry Potter – especially useful as a “global cultural reference” (page 152) – can be integrated into almost any classroom.

1 – “From Hogwarts Academy to the Hero’s Journey,” Lana A. Whited – The author compares and contrasts her experiences teaching Harry Potter to two very different audiences: 10- to 13-year-old children enrolled in Hogwarts Academy, a week-long summer enrichment class, and college sophomore literature students. An enjoyable start to this anthology, I found myself wishing I was young enough to attend Hogwarts myself, what with its Care of Magical Creatures and Defense of the Dark Arts lessons. The course sometimes even hosts a Snape impersonator in the form of Dr. Powell, a chemistry professor who brews up marshmallows and ice cream! Meanwhile, the older students examine Harry’s growth in the context of Otto Rank’s stages of the hero’s saga and Joseph Campbell’s monomyth of the hero’s journey. The author concludes that there are two ways of “knowing” literature – by the head and by the heart – and you can sometimes achieve the former by beginning with the latter.

(More below the fold…)

More swag from Columbia U!

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

2012-09-26 - Swag from Columbia U - 0019

A belated shout-out* to the nice people at Columbia University Press, who sent me copies of two of their latest animal-related titles: Animal Rights Without Liberation: Applied Ethics and Human Obligations by Alasdair Cochrane and Animals and Society: An Introduction to Human-Animal Studies by Margo DeMello, both of which came out in August.

I’m especially excited about Animals and Society, which is an introductory human-animal studies reader – a textbook – the first of its kind! Totally up my alley; I can’t tell you how much I wish my college had offered a HAS course or two back when I attended in the late ’90s/early aughts. (A quick perusal of their website shows that they STILL don’t offer any such courses. Boo! Hiss! Boo!)

Here’s some info about the author and book, via Amazon:

(More below the fold…)

Zoe Weil on "the MOGO principle": An excerpt from Most Good, Least Harm.

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Zoe Weil at College of the Atlantic July 2009 via the IHE on YouTube.
(Click through for a detailed description of the video,
as well as additional clips of the 90-minute talk.)
——————————

Good morning, y’all! Long time no see. In the wake of veganmofo, I’ve been so completely and utterly exhausted that the mere though of blogging is enough to send me, diving with no small amount of frenzy, back beneath my unintentionally festive, red-and-white striped bedsheets. (Burnt out, that’s me.) Luckily, I have several guest posts lined up which, along with a few fluffy, holiday-themed pieces, should carry us through the rest of the year! (Emerging from behind the clouds, Mr. Golden Sun shines in approval! Yes, I’m in a weird mood today; a week’s worth of criFSMas chores will do that to a person.) Let’s get to it, shall we?

Zoe Weil is the founder of the Institute for Humane Education (IHE), a group dedicated to training humane educators “big” (read: professional) and “small” (i.e., the rest of us). The IHE offers a number of online courses and in-person workshops to help spread the principles of humane education to teachers and students alike (not that the two groups are mutually exclusive, mind you!), including its Humane Education Certificate Program (HECP) and “MOGO” (most good) workshops.

Coming this January is the 30-day online course A Better World, A Meaningful Life. (In attendance will be Deb, one of my co-bloggers at Animal Rights & AntiOppression; keep an eye out for a possible post or two from her!) Based on Ms. Weil’s most recent book, Most Good, Least Harm: A Simple Principle for a Better World and Meaningful Life, the course explores how we as individuals can align our actions with our values. If you’re like to learn more, keep reading for an excerpt from Most Good, Least Harm, or check out the 8-minute video I’ve embedded above. (You may remember that I also interviewed Zoe for AR&AO back in August.)

(More below the fold…)

Kinship Circle: Rebuilding Lives, Two Hands At A Time

Saturday, December 27th, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Kinship Circle – kinshipcircle [at] accessus.net
Date: Dec 24, 2008 8:45 PM
Subject: Rebuilding Lives, Two Hands At A Time

KINSHIP CIRCLE ANIMAL DISASTER AID NETWORK

12/24/08: Rebuilding Lives, Two Hands At A Time
YEAR-END REFLECTIONS * http://www.kinshipcircle.org/disasters

THIS IS FOR YOU:

1. Rebuilding The Gulf Coast, Two Hands At A Time
2. Kinship Circle Recognized For Work In Iowa Floods 2008
3. The Great River Rescue
4. I Rescued A Human Today

=======================

1. Rebuilding The Gulf Coast, Two Hands At A Time

Kinship Circle - 2008-12-24 - Rebuilding Lives, Two Hands At A Time 01

SOURCE: 12/24/08, VIDEO – With My Own Two Hands
WATCH VIDEO NOW: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ44B33HRmo&NR=1

FROM KINSHIP CIRCLE: Thanks to my sister and fellow animal rescuer, Cara Shoss, for alerting me to this beautiful video and inspiration for this message. Brenda Shoss, president, Kinship Circle

From Cara Shoss, cshoss [at] gmail.com — Imagine what we could do if we all used our own two hands to change the world. Keep believing in what you are doing. Happy Holidays to all of you and thank you for using your two hands to make a difference for the animals in the world.

TURN UP YOUR SPEAKERS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ44B33HRmo&NR=1

KINSHIP CIRCLE REFERENCES:

GULF COAST: Animals In Gulf Coast Storms & Other Disasters
http://www.kinshipcircle.org/disasters/gulfcoast/default.html

(More below the fold…)

Goodbye, my sweet pit bull girl.

Monday, November 10th, 2008

2006-09-25 - Dogs-0021

Shadow came into our lives in the spring of ’97.

It was June 2nd – late spring, early summer. I was just finishing up my freshman year of college. Busy with school, busy with work, busy with friends. Busy, busy, busy.

Rochester springs are rainy, and the spring of 1997 was no exception. The last days of May saw a week-long rainstorm. Consequently, we spent little time outside that week. When the rain finally let up, my mom went out behind the garage – to do some yardwork, or maybe some spring cleaning. There, under our tree house on stilts, she found a shivering, emaciated little dog. The pup didn’t appear to have any identification – no collar or such – but she clearly wasn’t feral, either. She seemed scared of us, yet she didn’t bolt. My mother brought the skeletal dog a bowl of food and water. Gradually, the rest of the family arrived home from school and work, and we took turns trying to coax the little scrapper out from her cramped hiding place.

By now, it was apparent that the dog was injured. Her skin was raw and marked with gravel, and she didn’t seem able to stand. After what felt like forever, my father was able to get a good enough grip on her. He hoisted her up and into the back of his car, and off to the vet they went.

The veterinarian’s assessment, delivered the next day, was grim: the dog’s right rear leg was “shattered,” and she also had some minor cuts and bruises. Most likely she had been hit by a car: the point of impact, her broken, battered rear leg. Scraped skin and embedded gravel suggested a hard, skidding landing on pavement. She was in rough shape – and at the point of starvation, to boot.

Due to the severity of her injuries – and, even more so, the potential cost of repairing and rehabilitating her damaged leg – the vet recommended we euthanize her. “It’s too much trouble,” he said. “Too much money to spend on some stray.”

Luckily, my parents didn’t agree. I remember receiving a call from them that day at work: Well, Kelly, what do you think we should do? Even though they solicited our advice, I suspect that they’d already made their decision, and just needed an extra nudge from us kids. I think they wanted some reassurance that they weren’t crazy for spending a few grand to patch up a dog they didn’t even know. We were a solidly middle-class family, but two grand isn’t exactly peanuts for six people living on one income.

(More below the fold…)

InterNICHE: 2008 Humane Education Award – launch

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Nick Jukes
Date: Sat, May 31, 2008 at 9:51 AM
Subject: 2008 Humane Education Award – launch

InterNICHE announces the 2008 Humane Education Award to support ethical and effective life science education and training.

The Award is a grant program to enhance biological science, medical and veterinary medical education and training. Supported by Proefdiervrij, the Award offers 20,000 Euro (US$ 25,000) to be split between successful applicants.

Proposals are invited from all countries for initiatives to replace animal experiments and the dissection of purposely killed animals. Applicants may be teachers, students, campaigners or any other individuals committed to best practice education and training.

Examples of projects that may be funded through the Award include:

* Development of a new freeware CD-ROM, film, model or mannekin to achieve replacement

* Purchase of existing alternative products to achieve replacement

* Establishment of a student-based self-experimentation program to replace animals in physiology practical classes

* Establishment of a body donation program for securing ethically-sourced animal cadavers to replace animals killed for anatomy or surgery training

* Establishment of clinical learning opportunities to replace the use of laboratory animals in clinical skills, surgery or other practical classes

* Establishment of non-invasive field studies to replace the use of laboratory animals in ethology or other practical classes

(More below the fold…)

Kinship Circle: DIGEST – Israel Product Testing Ban, Serbia Still Poisoning, Iditarod Torture + MORE

Wednesday, January 24th, 2007

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Kinship Circle – info [at] kinshipcircle.org
Date: Jan 23, 2007 10:13 AM
Subject: KC DIGEST: Israel Product Testing Ban, Serbia Still Poisoning, Iditarod Torture + MORE

Kinship Circle Primary – PERMISSION TO CROSS-POST AS WRITTEN

1/23/07: Kinship Circle DIGEST / ALERTS FROM MEMBERS
Israel Product Testing Ban, Serbia Still Poisoning, Iditarod Torture + MORE

IN JANUARY DIGEST:

1. Julia Sharp, Well-Known Rescuer, Needs Our Help
2. Israel: Ban Animal Testing For Cosmetic/Cleaning Products
3. Serbia: Mass Poisoning (T-61) Begins Again
4. Serbia: Fire Your Weapons For Those Who Can’t
5. EU: Support Written Declaration, EU Ban On Bullfighting
6. Family Dog Shot By Police Denied Aid; Dies Slowly
7. Who’s Supporting Iditarod Dog Torture In 2007?
8. Spanish Galgo Appeal: Send Email To Save These Dogs
9. Wish SHAC 7’s Josh And Jake Happy Birthdays
10. Argentina: Horse Drops Dead On Street In Entre Rios
11. Atlanta Puppy-Baking Trial Date Set For 1/29/07
12. Romania: Urge Press To Cover Crimes Against Animals
13. Animal Activist’s Home Raided
14. A Stockyard Filled With Sad Brown Eyes
15. PETITIONS TO SIGN

Each DIGEST includes:

* NEWS and CALL-TO-ACTION, submitted by Kinship Circle members.
* CONTACT INFO to reply directly to the activist who supplied the alert.
* Related KINSHIP CIRCLE LINKS for more background information.
* Submissions are from KC members and do NOT originate from Kinship Circle itself.
* If emails for letter recipients fail, contact person who supplied alert — NOT KINSHIP CIRCLE.
* Send submissions for KC DIGEST to kinshipcircle [at] brick.net
* Please “clean-up” submitted alerts, and do not send chain of forwarded messages.

(More below the fold…)

Kinship Circle: [GULF COAST] We Are Rescue

Saturday, December 23rd, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Kinship Circle – kinshipcircle [at] brick.net
Date: Dec 23, 2006 8:18 PM
Subject: [GULF COAST] We Are Rescue

KINSHIP CIRCLE ANIMAL DISASTER RELIEF – PERMISSION TO CROSSPOST

12/23/06: We Are Rescue
PAST NEWSLETTERS: http://www.kinshipcircle.org/disasters/default.html

ANIMAL ISSUE OF THE WEEK: Slaughter On The Streets Of Serbia
TAKE ACTION

IN THIS ALERT:

1. ‘Twas The Night Before XMAS 2005 (A New Orleans Prayer)
2. At What Point Do We Stop?
3. A Clue? A Lead? To Bring Them Home…
4. NOLA: 12/28 Holiday Event To Help Katrina’s Animal Survivors
5. Trapping Help Needed In Bucktown (NOLA)
6. Building A No Kill Community: Seminar In Shreveport, LA
7. Katrina Causalities: Strays Of Lakeview, New Orleans
8. NOLA Vest-Up Campaign For Human/Canine Law Enforcers
9. A Katrina Cat Reunion For Early-ARNO Volunteer!
10. Katrina CNN: A Story Of Survival And Reunion
11. Troubled Waters Video – December 2006
12. Arraignment Set For Deputies In St. Bernard Street Shootings
13. Would It Have Been So Hard To Feed These Dogs?
14. Baton Rouge: Katrina-Rescued Pet Fish Need Home
15. Christmas In New Orleans, By Katrina Dog-Artist Larry
16. A Christmas Goodbye
17. A Christmas Wish For Our Best Friends
18. On The Anniversary Of His Passing – Love, Brenda

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(More below the fold…)

PCRM Event: Food for Life Diabetes Online Classes

Saturday, December 2nd, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: PCRM Nutrition and Research Assistant Tara Nicotra – info [at] pcrm.org
Date: Dec 1, 2006 2:20 PM
Subject: PCRM Event: Food for Life Diabetes Online Classes

You are invited to participate in the Food for Life Diabetes online series. This exciting new series offers education on diet and diabetes, along with group support. The classes feature lectures by PCRM president Dr. Neal Barnard and cooking demonstrations by PCRM nutritionist Dulcie Ward, R.D.

The next class is Dec. 6 at 3 p.m. EST. Two more classes follow on Dec. 13 and Dec. 20. Each session will last about 1 hour. You will need a high-speed Internet connection to participate. Additional computer requirements can be found here.

Click here to register for the remaining classes in the Food for Life Diabetes online series. Registration for the Dec. 6 class ends on Tuesday, Dec. 5.

Please forward this e-mail to friends, family members, listservs, or associations who might be interested. If you forward this e-mail to 10 or more people or groups, you will be eligible for a free copy of Dr. Barnard’s new book on diet and diabetes.

We look forward to having you join us!

Best Regards,

Tara Nicotra
PCRM Nutrition and Research Assistant

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste. 400
Washington, DC 20016 Phone: 202-686-2210
E-mail: info [at] pcrm.org

——————

Tagged:

FEMA: Disaster Information & Online Courses for Livestock Owners

Sunday, August 27th, 2006

In addition to offering disaster guidelines for “pet owners,” FEMA also has recommendations for those who care for “livestock” (oy, how I hate those terms!).

As with companion animals, an online Independent Study (IS) course is available for livestock as well:

* IS-111 Livestock In Disasters

Additionally, FEMA recommends that livestock owners take the general “animals in disasters” courses aimed at companion animals:

* IS-10 Animals in Disaster, Awareness and Preparedness

* IS-11 Animals in Disaster, Community Planning

In general, FEMA/EMI IS courses are free to US citizens and can be completed in two to twelve hours, all from the comfort of your home. To learn more, please see their FAQ. A full list of their 50+ courses is available here.

—–

Information for Livestock Owners

If you have large animals such as horses, cattle, sheep, goats, or pigs on your property, be sure to prepare before a disaster.
 
 
Preparation Guidelines:

* Ensure all animals have some form of identification that will help facilitate their return.

* Evacuate animals whenever possible. Arrangements for evacuation, including routes and host sites, should be made in advance. Alternate routes should be mapped out in case the planned route is inaccessible.

* The evacuation sites should have or be able to readily obtain food, water, veterinary care, handling equipment and facilities.

* Make available vehicles and trailers needed for transporting and supporting each type of animal. Also make available experienced handlers and drivers.

Note: It is best to allow animals a chance to become accustomed to vehicular travel so they are less frightened and easier to move.

* If evacuation is not possible, a decision must be made whether to move large animals to available shelter or turn them outside. This decision should be determined based on the type of disaster and the soundness and location of the shelter (structure).
 
 
Cold Weather Guidelines:

When temperatures plunge below zero, livestock producers need to give extra attention to their animals. Prevention is the key to dealing with hypothermia, frostbite and other cold weather injuries in livestock.

Making sure your livestock has the following help prevent cold-weather maladies:

* Shelter

* Plenty of dry bedding to insulate vulnerable udders, genitals and legs from the frozen ground and frigid winds.

* Windbreaks to keep animals safe from frigid conditions.

* Plenty of food and water

Also, take extra time to observe livestock, looking for early signs of disease and injury. Severe cold-weather injuries or death primarily occur in the very young or in animals that are already debilitated. Cases of coldweather-related sudden death in calves often result when cattle are suffering from undetected infection, particularly pneumonia. Sudden, unexplained livestock deaths and illnesses should be investigated quickly so that a cause can be identified and steps can be taken to protect remaining animals.

Animals suffering from frostbite don’t exhibit pain. It may be up to two weeks before the injury becomes evident as freeze-damaged tissue starts to slough away. At that point, the injury should be treated as an open wound and a veterinarian should be consulted.
 
 
Last Modified: Tuesday, 21-Mar-2006 08:41:50 EST

—–

Additional Disaster Information from FEMA is available here.

FEMA: Disaster Information & Online Courses for Pet Owners

Sunday, August 27th, 2006

In compiling some information for my Hurricane Katrina page, I came across the following information from FEMA. Since we’re in the midst in hurricane season – and fast approaching the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina – I think FEMA’s disaster guidelines merit a mention.

In addition to the guidelines for “pet owners,” FEMA also offers the following training courses online:

* IS-10 Animals in Disaster, Awareness and Preparedness

* IS-11 Animals in Disaster, Community Planning

Both are web-based Independent Study (IS) courses, and well worth a look if you have the time.

According to the FEMA/EMI FAQ, the IS courses are generally offered free of charge to US residents, and in some cases may earn you college credit. A full list of their 50+ courses is available here.

A great deal, and one I definitely plan on taking advantage of in the coming weeks!

—–

Information for Pet Owners

* Plan for Pet Disaster Needs
* Prepare to Shelter Your Pet
* During a Disaster
* After a Disaster

If you evacuate your home, DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND! Pets most likely cannot survive on their own; and if by some remote chance they do, you may not be able to find them when you return.

For additional information, please contact The Humane Society of the United States.
 
 
Plan for Pet Disaster Needs

* Identifying shelter. For public health reasons, many emergency shelters cannot accept pets. Find out which motels and hotels in the area you plan to evacuate to allow pets — well in advance of needing them. There are also a number of guides that list hotels/motels that permit pets and could serve as a starting point. Include your local animal shelter’s number in your list of emergency numbers — they might be able to provide information concerning pets during a disaster.

* Take pet food, bottled water, medications, veterinary records, cat litter/pan, can opener, food dishes, first aid kit and other supplies with you in case they’re not available later. While the sun is still shining, consider packing a “pet survival” kit which could be easily deployed if disaster hits.

* Make sure identification tags are up to date and securely fastened to your pet’s collar. If possible, attach the address and/or phone number of your evacuation site. If your pet gets lost, his tag is his ticket home. Make sure you have a current photo of your pet for identification purposes.

* Make sure you have a secure pet carrier, leash or harness for your pet so that if he panics, he can’t escape.
 
 
Prepare to Shelter Your Pet

* Call your local emergency management office, animal shelter, or animal control office to get advice and information.

* If you are unable to return to your home right away, you may need to board your pet. Find out where pet boarding facilities are located. Be sure to research some outside your local area in case local facilities close.

* Most boarding kennels, veterinarians and animal shelters will need your pet’s medical records to make sure all vaccinations are current. Include copies in your “pet survival” kit along with a photo of your pet.

* NOTE: Some animal shelters will provide temporary foster care for owned pets in times of disaster, but this should be considered only as a last resort.

* If you have no alternative but to leave your pet at home, there are some precautions you must take, but remember that leaving your pet at home alone can place your animal in great danger! Confine your pet to a safe area inside — NEVER leave your pet chained outside! Leave them loose inside your home with food and plenty of water. Remove the toilet tank lid, raise the seat and brace the bathroom door open so they can drink. Place a notice outside in a visible area, advising what pets are in the house and where they are located. Provide a phone number where you or a contact can be reached as well as the name and number of your vet.
 
 
During a Disaster

* Bring your pets inside immediately.

* Have newspapers on hand for sanitary purposes. Feed the animals moist or canned food so they will need less water to drink.

* Animals have instincts about severe weather changes and will often isolate themselves if they are afraid. Bringing them inside early can stop them from running away. Never leave a pet outside or tied up during a storm.

* Separate dogs and cats. Even if your dogs and cats normally get along, the anxiety of an emergency situation can cause pets to act irrationally. Keep small pets away from cats and dogs.

* In an emergency, you may have to take your birds with you. Talk with your veterinarian or local pet store about special food dispensers that regulate the amount of food a bird is given. Make sure that the bird is caged and the cage is covered by a thin cloth or sheet to provide security and filtered light.
 
 
After a Disaster

* If after a disaster you have to leave town, take your pets with you. Pets are unlikely to survive on their own.

* In the first few days after the disaster, leash your pets when they go outside. Always maintain close contact. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet may become confused and lost. Also, snakes and other dangerous animals may be brought into the area with flood areas. Downed power lines are a hazard.

* The behavior of your pets may change after an emergency. Normally quiet and friendly pets may become aggressive or defensive. Watch animals closely. Leash dogs and place them in a fenced yard with access to shelter and water.
 
 
Last Modified: Tuesday, 01-Aug-2006 16:31:09 EDT

—–

Additional Disaster Information from FEMA is available here.