Stacking the Shelves: December in Books

Saturday, December 26th, 2015

This month’s Stacking the Shelves post is pretty modest, considering it includes Christmas. Since losing Peedee last month, we’ve had a hard time getting into the holiday spirit; and the only presents I exchanged with anyone was the dogs. So the only books I acquired this month were the ones I bought or won. Which is still more than I can read in a month – at least in my current jello brain state – so that’s okay! Receiving more books for Christmas when I still haven’t gotten to all of last year’s gifts probably would have made me feel a wee bit guilty anyway.

Also, I just started reviewing again after a two-month hiatus, and seeing as I’m struggling with a moderate backlog, I resisted the urge (and it was a strong one!) to request any more e-galleys this month. My trigger finger’s feeling mighty itchy, though.

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Just in time for Christmas, I received this lovely illustrated book of poetry, written from the point of view of Farm Sanctuary’s rescue animals. Signed by author Maya Gottfried, who graciously gave away three copies of Our Farm on twitter.

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I scored a few used Tamora Pierce titles on BookMooch! Maybe I should join readwritelove28’s Tamora Pierce reading challenge after all?

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I’ve been looking forward to this one forever: Amy Lukavics’s Daughters Unto Devils, courtesy of @HarlequinTeen and The Irish Banana! Posed next to my weirdo hybrid Halloween-Christmas decorations because SPOOKY.

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Book Review: Invincible Summer: An Anthology, Volume 1, Nicole Georges (2007)

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Like peeking inside a stranger’s diary…

three out of five stars

I first became acquainted with Nicole Georges’s charming and whimsical artwork through Bitch magazine, to which Georges is (was?) a “friend and contributor.” Her annual Invincible Summer calendars (available on etsy) are simply adorable, brimming as they are with nonhuman animals both familiar (dogs, pigs, chickens) and unusual (sloths, whales, and – yes! – unicorns!). Her two Invincible Summer zine anthologies have been on my wishlist for years, and Christmas 2013 was the year that Volume 1 finally found its way under my tree. It had the distinction (however dubious) of being my first read of the new year!

Invincible Summer: An Anthology is like peeking inside a stranger’s diary. (Indeed, Georges refers to her zines as “Diaryland.”) Georges explores her life in Portland from the spring of 2001 through the summer of 2004-ish, with some sketches from the 2006 calendar thrown in for good measure. (Though it’s missing April and May! *frowny face*) Entries range from the mundane (daily chores, to-do lists, recipes; chickpea meatballs, must try!) to the less so (apparent PTSD in the wake of a car crash; “on car accidents” is especially haunting).

In particular, I was able to relate to the loneliness and alienation Georges felt after moving to a strange new city, as well as her outlandish dreams (most of them dental in nature), and vestigial tail obsession. Plus you have to love a zine that’s heavy on the animals: Georges’s dogs Beija (whom she describes as her “life partner”) and Penny make frequent appearances, and she also spends a month interning at Farm Sanctuary in California and later takes a summer-long job there. Through this, Georges addresses the horrors of animal agriculture, including egg production and animal auctions.

(More below the fold…)

Meet Jasper, Sasha, Filipe, Teddy, Amigo and Pancho…and the Farm Animal Adoption Network!

Saturday, June 19th, 2010

Back in March, Farm Sanctuary came to the rescue of six calves who were left to starve at a farm in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. Some were left tethered to a tractor, while others were found locked in a garage; all were abandoned by their “owner.”* Most likely castoffs of the dairy industry, the calves were weak, frail and sickly and required immediate medical care:

After learning about the suffering calves, Farm Sanctuary immediately launched a rescue effort, and staff drove to pick up the calves halfway between the Pennsylvania farm and our New York Shelter. The calves we greeted were a terrible sight. Their eyes were sunken in from severe dehydration, and they were pale, coughing and extremely weak. They were fighting life-threatening infections, and most were unable to stand on their own. Four of the calves weighed less than they would have at birth, and their prognosis looked grim. Medical care was urgently needed to stabilize the calves, so our rescue team rushed them to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals for critical emergency care.

The following weeks were filled with constant care and anxious waiting as these sickly calves struggled to become well. But slowly, their fragile, battered bodies began to heal, and, in time, each came home from the hospital.

Though their lives began in violence and suffering, these babies are now safe, valued and loved. And in need of a forever home!: Farm Sanctuary is currently looking for one or more individuals to adopt dear Jasper, Sasha, Filipe, Teddy, Amigo and Pancho – as well as Vito and Clancy, two young Holstein steers who managed to escape from their captors before finding Farm Sanctuary. Thanks to Farm Sanctuary (as well as the Hillside SPCA and an anonymous tipster), these someones now have names whereas only numbers hinted at their unique, individual identities before. They are so much more than cogs in a capitalist machine, or producers of milk and flesh. They are sons, brothers, friends.

If you are willing and able to adopt any of these sweethearts (all of whom must be rehomed in pairs), you can find contact information and addition details here.

(More below the fold…)

TONIGHT: Hit Fox Show Bones to Spotlight Farm Sanctuary Footage

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

I just spotted this notice from Farm Sanctuary in my inbox and thought I’d share. Tune in to Fox tonight at 8PM Eastern time, where the “darkly comic procedural drama”* Bones will feature undercover factory farm footage secured by Farm Sanctuary and specially requested by the show’s star – fellow vegan Emily Deschanel.

Alas, I won’t be watching. Though I adore Bones, I’m somewhat of a newbie fan, and am only halfway through Season 4 on DVD. Tonight’s episode will languish on my DVR until the Mr. and I catch up. So no spoilers, mkay?

———- Forwarded message ———-
Date: Thu, Nov 5, 2009 at 4:04 PM
Subject: TONIGHT: Hit Fox Show “Bones” to Spotlight Farm Sanctuary Factory Farming Footage

Kelly,

Very exciting news! Tonight’s episode (8pm/7 Central) of the hit FOX show “Bones” will be spotlighting Farm Sanctuary footage of cruel factory farming practices. Please see below for full details. Make sure to tune in and please spread the word!

All the best,

Meredith

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Farm Sanctuary Footage of Cruel Factory Farming Practices Spotlighted on Hit FOX TV Show “Bones”

NEW YORK, NY – November 5, 2009 – Tonight’s episode of the hit FOX television show “Bones” (airing at 8pm/7 Central), starring vegan actress and Farm Sanctuary supporter Emily Deschanel, will prominently feature factory farming footage secured by Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization, as part of a plot-line surrounding a murder that takes place at a chicken farm.

The footage, which was requested by Deschanel, will educate thousands of mainstream viewers about the cruel conditions animals are forced to endure on factory farms. The episode also features a character who rescues a pig and asks her coworkers for donations so that she can sponsor her at a sanctuary.

To further raise awareness of the horrors of factory farming, FOX is featuring a special message from Deschanel on their website (http://fox.com/bones/) urging people to support Farm Sanctuary by sponsoring an animal in need.

To learn more about “adopting” one of Farm Sanctuary’s rescued animals, please visit farmsanctuary.org.

(More below the fold…)

Odds & Ends: Flu Factories, Shelter "Pets" & JVM

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

Here are a few links I’ve been sitting on for awhile. So much to discuss, so little time. Oh, the life of a B-list blogger!

In no particular order:

1. Flu Factories: Tracing the Origins of the Swine Flu Pandemic

Dr. Greger, whose Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching I reviewed several years back, was kind enough to send me a copy of his latest project, Flu Factories: Tracing the Origins of the Swine Flu Pandemic. Flu Factories is a one-hour presentation by Dr. Greger on the H1N1 influenza pandemic; it’s available for purchase on DVD, or for free viewing (in 40 parts!) on the HSUS’s website.

While I haven’t yet had a chance to view the entire video, if it’s anything like Bird Flu (and, judging from the chapter titles, there looks to be much crossover, particularly in the areas of biology and history), it’s bound to be both illuminating and terrifying. Although Dr. Greger doesn’t take an explicitly animal rights/vegan position in Bird Flu (nor do I know anything about his personal politics, his position at the HSUS notwithstanding), he does emphasize the role that factory farming – and, to a lesser extent, animal agriculture in general – plays in zoonotic diseases, including the influenza (avian and swine). If you can ignore the speciesism (e.g., in the quoted resources), it’s well worth a watch.

Embedded above is a clip from the presentation: Chapter 2, the 1918 Flu Pandemic.

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Sometimes I feel like a motherless child. *

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

A few weeks ago, I wrote about Karma, a cow spared a life of suffering on a “small ranch” by the farmed animal sanctuary Gentle Barn. After they ferried her to safety, Karma’s rescuers soon realized that she had recently given birth, and was crying out in misery for her child, who had been left behind. Long story short, Gentle Barn was able to persuade the rancher to relinquish custody of Karma’s baby, who they named Mr. Rojas. Mother and child were reunited, and months later – much to Gentle Barn’s surprise – Karma gave birth to another calf. Happily, Karma and sons will be able to live out the rest of their lives in safety and security, together as a family – the way it should be, for animals everywhere.

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Unfortunately, precious few stories have such a happy ending. I couldn’t help but be reminded of Karma’s tale when I received this press release from Farm Sanctuary:

Lamb Born in Transport Truck on Way to Bronx Slaughterhouse Finds Refuge at Farm Sanctuary as Mother Goes to Slaughter

Watkins Glen, NY – September 22, 2009 – A lamb born on a transport truck on the way to a Bronx slaughterhouse was rescued yesterday by Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization, and brought to their shelter in Watkins Glen, NY. The minutes old lamb was discovered by a Good Samaritan who was shopping at an Italian market just a few doors down from the slaughterhouse when the truck arrived. Wanting to get a closer look at the sheep as they were unloaded, the woman walked over to the truck and was shocked to discover a newborn lamb among the herd, as well as a less fortunate lamb who had been trampled to death during transport.

When she brought the lamb to the truck driver’s attention, he grabbed him and handed him to her, explaining that one of the sheep must have given birth on the truck. When asked by the concerned citizen if it would be possible to reunite the struggling newborn with his mother, the driver told her there was no way to identify the lamb’s mother, as there were more than one hundred sheep on the truck. Refusing to leave the abandoned lamb alone to starve or be trampled to death by the flock, the woman convinced the slaughterhouse manager to relinquish him to her. As the lamb’s mother went to slaughter, she took the newborn home to her Yonkers residence, where he spent the first five days of his life growing very attached to the woman’s elderly mother— who he reportedly followed around the house like a puppy.

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“We are so thankful we were able to rescue this sweet lamb, who was born under circumstances no animal should ever have to endure,” said Susie Coston, Farm Sanctuary’s national shelter director. “Having witnessed the deep and loving bond between mother sheep and their lambs at our sanctuary, we know first-hand how traumatic this experience must have been for both mother and baby. Unfortunately, such tragedies are an all too common result of a profit-driven industry that rips babies away from their mothers and packs sensitive, intelligent animals onto trucks so densely they cannot move, causing many to die before they even reach the slaughterhouse. This lamb may have been born under horrific circumstances, but he will live at our shelter as an ambassador, educating thousands of visitors from all over the country about the plight of animals whose first and only taste of life is the inside of a sweltering transport truck or a dark, filthy factory farm.”

(More below the fold…)

Hello, Vaute Coat. (Goodbye, XL Blue!*)

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

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Vaute Couture

Perhaps you’ve heard of them? They’re a vegan fashion house based in Chicago? Supportive of emerging artists, eco-friendly and cruelty-free? Founder Leanne Mai-ly Hilgar was recently named one of the “20 Under 30” by VegNews magazine? (You remember! – the list that made the rest of us vegans feel like sorry slackers?)

– anyhow, in 2008, Vaute Couture announced that they wanted to design and launch a special new winter coat, the sale of which would benefit Farm Sanctuary. VC left the specifics of the planned peacoat up to a popular vote, which closed last October. The result? A seriously cute pea/dress coat, dubbed the Vaute Coat (and also known, quite appropriately, as the “Farm Sanctuary benefit coat”). Naturally, it’s 100% vegan and way too expensive for my pocketbook. But if you *heart* fashion and Farm Sanctuary – or *heart* someone who does (a blogger, by any chance? maybe she has a potty mouth and wears a size medium?) – the Vaute Coat would make a sweet x-mas gift, just not to die for.

Here are the details, via Farm Sanctuary:

Introducing Fall/Winter’s Must-Have Item: The First High Style + Function Coat with a Conscience

– Sales of Vaute Couture’s 100% Vegan, Ethically Produced Coat to Benefit Farm Sanctuary’s Rescue and Rehabilitation Work for Abused Farm Animals –

– Activist Fashion House on Forefront of Vegan Fashion Trend –

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Chicago, IL – July 14, 2009 – When Michael Jackson sang about turning up the collar on his favorite winter coat in “Man in the Mirror,” his anthem to discovering your ethical core, he very well could have been singing about Vaute Couture’s mission to change the world one fabulously chic, vegan, eco-conscious coat at a time. This fall/winter, the Chicago-based activist fashion house is “gonna make a change” for farm animals with the launch of their limited run “Vaute” coat. Already on the wish list of conscientious fashion forward women around the world and guaranteed to become your favorite winter coat, all profits from the sale of this runway-worthy coat are being donated to Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization, to support their vital mission to end cruelty to animals and promote compassionate living through rescue, education and advocacy.

(More below the fold…)

Intersectionality ‘Round the Interwebs, No. 2

Thursday, June 11th, 2009

lol jayne - speciesism 101, pot 1

Kelly Garbato (that’s me!) @ Animal Rights at Change.org: Intersectionality 101: Sexism, Racism, Speciesism, and More and Intersectionality and Animal Advocacy

Stephanie at Change.org kindly invited me to guest post at the Animal Rights blog; Intersectionality 101 and Intersectionality and Animal Advocacy are my first contributions. This is a two-part post in which I introduce the concept of intersectionality, explain how intersectionality can help us better understand (and dismantle) our exploitation of animals, and argue for the inclusion of other anti-“ism” activism in the animal advocacy movement. Please stop by and share your thoughts!

Also worth checking out: the new(ly visible) “oppression connections” post category on Animal Rights.

Briar Levit @ Bitch Blogs: Nicole Georges pays tribute to the Queer Animal Kingdom

Last week, I noted how media such as Green Porno, by celebrating non-human animals in all their sexual diversity, has the potential to liberate and uplift animals of all species.

In this vein, Briar Levit introduces us to Nicole Georges, “a zinester, illustrator, and pet portrait artist” (and also a contributor to Bitch magazine), whose latest project is “an exploration of the Queer Animal Kingdom” – as explained in this documentary:

Nicole Georges 5/1/09 from cat on Vimeo.

As far as feminist media goes, Bitch seems to be the most animal-friendly magazine out there (with a very vocal – albeit minority – vegan/vegetarian readership!), so if you’re so inclined, you can check ’em out here.

Igualdad Animal / Animal Equality: Press release about ‘The Running of the Nudes’ and PETA

Igualdad Animal (Animal Equality) describes itself as “an international non-profit organisation dedicating to gaining equal consideration and respect for animals. Founded in Madrid (Spain) in January 2006 by Sharon Nunez, Javier Moreno and Jose Valle, it is currently active in Spain, Peru, Venezuela and Colombia.”

In this press release, Igualdad Animal offers its thoughts on PETA’s upcoming annual anti-bullfighting demonstration, “The Running of the Nudes.” Not surprisingly, the group is unimpressed, both with PETA’s animal welfare efforts, as well as their poor record vis-à-vis marginalized groups of humans, including women.

(More below the fold…)

Farm Sanctuary’s Country Hoe Down is this weekend!

Friday, May 15th, 2009

Photo via Farm Sanctuary & Connie Pugh; Farm Sanctuary supporter Rosebud makes peace with Calvin Pig at the 2008 CA Country Hoe Down.

If you find yourself in or around Orland, California this weekend, consider yourself one lucky activist! Farm Sanctuary is holding its annual Country Hoe Down this Saturday and Sunday. Writers, journalists and bloggers in particular should plan to be there, as there appear to be plenty of opportunities for interviews and networking!

Just be sure to have enough fun for the both of us; the animal advocacy community rarely holds its events in Kansas City, even though the city is technically located smack dab in the middle of the country. Sniff, sniff.

(You can view photos of previous Farm Sanctuary events here, btw.)

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Meredith Turner
Date: Thu, May 14, 2009 at 7:38 PM
Subject: You’re Invited! Farm Sanctuary’s Country Hoe Down THIS WEEKEND!

Have plans for the weekend? Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization, would like to invite you to attend/cover our annual Country Hoe Down at our Orland, CA Shelter this Saturday, May 16 and Sunday, May 17. If you’ve never visited our farm, this whimsical two-day event is the perfect time to come out, meet the hundreds of rescued animals who call it home and enjoy a rejuvenating taste of the country life!

Please let me know if you would like to join us for a day of hayrides, farm tours, fascinating speaker presentations, delicious food, drinks, live music and an evening barn dance you won’t soon forget! For more information, please see the press release below. Gene Baur, Farm Sanctuary’s president and co-founder, will be available for interviews. We look forward to seeing you there!

All the best,

Meredith

(More below the fold…)

Family and friends.

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Sorry for the lack of posts lately. I’ve been busy and tired and stressed and [insert your excuse here]. Still recovering from a weekend spent hauling railroad ties to and fro, in order to prepare the garden for the coming season. I was so tired last night, I had trouble sleeping, and woke up exhausted. I hate it when that happens.

Anyway, go check out Sanctuary Tails, one of Farm Sanctuary’s latest projects (the other being Making Hay). I’m totally digging on the new blog, and find myself returning to it whenever I’m in need of a smile – it never fails to deliver.

Many of the most recent entries deal with love, family and friendship among the sanctuary’s varied inhabitants: there’s Dutch the duck, Molly and Morgan the goats, and Sprinkles and Tim the piglets.

Oh, the piglets!

There’s not an animal species on earth I don’t love, but I’ve got a special place in the cockles for pigs. Probably because my own two (canine) girls, Kaylee and O-Ren, remind me of a mama sow and her baby piglet. They both have cute lil’ piggy butts; Kaylee, owing to the several+ litters she birthed before making her way to us, has a slightly stretched belly and large, obviously, err, used nipples, whereas Rennie’s got a bald, pink, pokey lil’ tummy. In the morning, Kaylee barks and dances for breakfast, while Rennie will stay behind in bed with me (if Shane’s nice and present enough to feed the dogs before I arise), roll over onto my pillow, and rub her “piggy fat” in my face. I cannot think of a more delightful way to start the day. Seriously.

Speaking of the family, now’s as good a time as any to share a few photos of Shane and the dogs. I took ’em Sunday afternoon, after we’d finished the weekend’s yardwork, which is why he looks so beat. The dogs, on the other hand, spent the day lounging in the sun, so they were full of…something. Ralphie and Peedee were play-fighting all over the place, totally oblivious to Miss Kaylee, who just wanted a little lovin’ from daddy. Rennie, as usual, was all about the tennis ball.

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Four degrees from Kevin Bacon, two degrees from Gene Baur!

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

Last week, the Mr. interviewed Gene Baur of Farm Sanctuary fame for his weekly podcast, The Libertarian Dime. I know, I know; libertarianism might seem a strange pairing for veg*nism, but Shane assures me that veg*nism as it relates to a “policy of non-aggression” has a long history in the school of libertarian thought. Wev. I’m just happy that he’s using his soapbox to introduce fellow white heterosexual nerd-doods to animal lib topics. His co-host even agreed to go vegetarian for 30 days, starting on January 2nd. Yay Jonathan!

Here’s the show description:

In this episode of the Libertarian Dime, Shane and Jonathan interview Gene Baur of the Farm Sanctuary organization. The discussion covered a wide range of topics from factory farming to Silk Nog. Shane tied the goals of Farm Sanctuary to the libertarian philosophy of “non-aggression towards others.” This is an episode covering a topic you’ll not hear on other libertarian podcasts. It’s a must listen.

As an interesting aside, Shane’s work on the Libertarian Dime means I’m two degrees removed from Gene Baur, and a mere four from Kevin Bacon (Shane to Michael Shermer to Stephen Colbert to Kevin Bacon, who helped Stephen decorate his Nixon tree on last night’s show.)

Anyway, you can take a listen here. (And no, I haven’t had a chance to listen to it yet; this doesn’t make me an awful wife so much as a busy one. Viva la CriFSMas!)

Note to Shane: when I promise you a shout out, a shout out you get!

Colbert Report Shout-Out

Waaaaaaaaaaaa!

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Farm Sanctuary: Online Auction on Charity Buzz Ends September 18

Wednesday, September 10th, 2008

I already linked to Farm Sanctuary’s Charity Buzz auction(s) in a Link Sanctuary a few days ago, but just thought I’d pass along this additional info from Charity Buzz, since they were nice enough to email me an all. (The flattery, it works!)

All of my extra cash is being funneled towards landscaping/farm equipment and such, but some of these items look awesome. Happy bidding!

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Maya Wertheim
Date: Mon, Sep 8, 2008 at 1:04 PM
Subject: Farm Sanctuary’s Spring Online Auction News

Hi Kelly,

I hope this email finds you well. I am reaching out to easyvegan.info on behalf of charitybuzz.com and Farm Sanctuary. We are honored to partner with Farm Sanctuary for the second time in creating an online auction to raise money for the organization’s dedication to ending cruelty to farm animals and promoting compassionate living through rescue, education, and advocacy.

EasyVegan is an amazing website for getting the word out for the Farm Sanctuary Online Auction. In an effort to raise money and awareness for the organization their generous celebrity supporters have contributed auction experiences that include:

* Lunch in LA with Alicia Silverstone
* Studio Lunch With Kristen Bell & Gift Bag from Heroes
* Movie Set Visit OR Lunch in LA with Forest Whitaker with his Daughter and Vegetarian Animal Advocate, True Whitaker
* Joan Jett VIP Concert Tickets with Hotel & Airfare for Two
* Two Tickets to Boeing Boeing on Broadway PLUS a Meet & Greet with Star Gina Gershon
* Dinner with Hal Sparks and His “Suicide Girl”-friend, Samantha Humphreys
* Meet Legendary Actress Loretta Swit
* Intensive Study Program with Emmy Award-Winning Vegan Chef Christina Pirello
* Private Dinner Class Hosted by Spork Foods with Skinny Bitch Co-Author Rory Freedman

With many more experiences and items up for auction, we would love if you could encourage your readers and interested bidders to take a look at the auction: http://farmsanctuary.charitybuzz.com/viewLots.do

Please let me know if there’s anything you can do – the auction went live last week and is closing on September 18th. I hope that you will join us for this online auction to help further Farm Sanctuary’s mission. I can send over any additional information, images, etc. Thanks so much – I look forward to hearing from you. You can reach me at mwertheim [at] charitybuzz.com or 203.226.8306.

Best Regards,

Maya Wertheim

[http://www.charitybuzz.com/]

203-226-8306 office
203-621-3092 fax

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Farm Sanctuary: Iowa Pigs Still Need Help

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Farm Sanctuary – info [at] farmsanctuary.org
Date: Tue, Jul 8, 2008 at 7:40 PM
Subject: Iowa Pigs Still Need Help

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I know that we recently reached out to you for help, but we are still in urgent need of funding to continue the mission to save pigs from the Midwest flood disaster.

This emergency rescue is historic, both in its mission and scope, and is expected to be one of the most expensive rescue operations Farm Sanctuary has ever undertaken. But we couldn’t turn our backs on farm animals in need; we couldn’t leave any pigs behind.

Farm Sanctuary’s emergency rescue team is continuing to work day and night on the ground in Iowa to save the pigs. The urgency of the situation is only growing, as we have now rescued 69 pigs, most of whom are in very poor condition and a number of whom are pregnant.

We need your help right now to provide emergency onsite care to the pigs and transport them out of the disaster zone, as we have secured all survivors on the Iowa levee. Given the condition, number and size of these animals, this endeavor is massive.

Right now, Farm Sanctuary’s National Shelter Director Susie Coston is onsite in Iowa providing triage care at a temporary holding facility. Here, the pigs are receiving care for third degree burns and treatment for abscesses and wounds.

(More below the fold…)

Farm Sanctuary: Midwest Pigs Urgently in Need of Placement

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Farm Sanctuary – info [at] farmsanctuary.org
Date: Wed, Jul 2, 2008 at 11:33 AM
Subject: Midwest Pigs Urgently in Need of Placement

HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR RESCUED PIGS – WE IMMEDIATELY NEED ADOPTIVE HOMES FOR PIGS IN ORDER TO SAVE AS MANY ANIMALS AS POSSIBLE FROM THE MIDWEST FLOOD DISASTER.

Kinship Circle - 2008-06-20 - IOWA FLOOD, Notes From The Water's Edge 11

Kinship Circle - 2008-06-20 - IOWA FLOOD, Notes From The Water's Edge 13

As we reported to you last week, Farm Sanctuary’s emergency rescue team is currently on the ground in Oakville, Iowa saving pigs stranded in the Mississippi River floods and providing them with emergency care and temporary shelter.

Thankfully, our efforts are proving successful as we now have 28 pigs in our custody. Many are in critical condition (suffering from injuries, pneumonia and third degree sunburns) and are receiving urgent care.

Now, as rescue efforts continue, we must quickly secure a large number of adoptive homes for pigs: http://www.farmsanctuary.org/rescue/adoption.html

We continue to find more and more pigs still alive, surviving against all odds in fields, on levees, anywhere they can find refuge. Pigs are extremely resourceful, intelligent animals they are fighters; they are survivors. After this tremendous demonstration of their will to live and all that they have endured, they deserve peace and comfort in their lives, as well as a chance to know that there is kindness in the world. PLEASE HELP by providing an adoptive home for as many pigs as you can.

Among those we have rescued is a brave, strong mother pig who gave birth to seven piglets within the past couple of days amidst the floods. She and her babies have survived the ordeal but this mother now needs a safe place to call home and nurture and raise her piglets.

Our need for homes is extremely urgent, as Farm Sanctuary already provides lifelong care to more than 50 pigs. We are continuing to rescue as many as we can, but our efforts can only continue with your participation in this extraordinary rescue.

Many of the rescued pigs swam for their lives to escape deadly flood waters. They were stranded without food or water, injured, sick, frightened, and confused. These pigs need you to give them hope for the future and keep them safe from harm forever.

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Farm Sanctuary: Disaster strikes for farm animals; Stranded Pigs Need Urgent Help

Thursday, June 26th, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Farm Sanctuary – info [at] farmsanctuary.org
Date: Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 12:56 PM
Subject: Disaster strikes for farm animals: Stranded Pigs Need Urgent Help

Kinship Circle - 2008-06-24 - Emergency Sheltering Volunteers Needed In Iowa 01

EMERGENCY RESCUE FUND
Stranded Pigs Need Urgent Help!

Flood waters have ravaged the Midwest, and farm animals need immediate rescue! The recent flooding has hit largely agricultural areas, leaving pigs, cattle and other animals stranded.

Hundreds of factory farm pigs have been left trapped and drowning in crates, or freed only to be swept away by rapid currents … trying desperately to survive on area levees.

Farm Sanctuary dispatched a rescue team with our large animal rescue trailer last week and we are currently on the ground in Iowa and Illinois to save drowning and stranded pigs.

Please, give to the Emergency Rescue Fund right now to help our lifesaving efforts and rescue these stranded, suffering animals:

https://secure2.vegsource.com/farmsanc/fs/donate_erf_pigs08_alert.html

This rescue is urgent and every moment counts. We, and the pigs, need your help right now.

Many pigs swam for their lives to the closest land or levee. Many are stranded without food or water. They are desperately clinging to life and waiting for rescuers to arrive.

Farm Sanctuary is working with other organizations to transport surviving pigs to a temporary holding area, and once pigs are in our custody, Farm Sanctuary will be ensuring their immediate care and transport to sanctuary.

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Beat the Heat and Unwind with Friends on Twilight Tour of Farm Sanctuary

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008

COMMUNITY CALENDAR LISTING

Contact: Natalie Bowman, 607-583-2225 ext. 250, nbowman [at] farmsanctuary.org

Beat the Heat and Unwind with Friends on Twilight Tour of Farm Sanctuary

Orland, CA – May 30, 2008 – Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization, invites animal lovers of all ages to beat the summer heat by taking a special evening tour of its breathtaking 300-acre shelter in Orland, California on June 28. At this intimate Twilight Tour event, guests can commune with hundreds of rescued farm animals as they ready for bed and then unwind with friends and refreshments as the sun sets over Black Butte Lake.

Farm Sanctuary’s Twilight Tour includes a unique guided evening tour of the California Shelter, complete with facts on the nocturnal habits of farm animals; a casual sunset reception with sweet and savory vegan snacks and an assortment of beverages-including wine and beer for adults; family-friendly activities, and a pajama contest for kids and the young at heart.

WHEN: Saturday, June 28, 2008; 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

WHERE: Farm Sanctuary, 19080 Newville Rd., Orland, CA

REGISTRATION: Registration costs $10 per adult and $5 per child and includes the tour, as well as beverages and snacks. Deadline for registration is Wednesday, June 25. Call 607-583-2225 ext. 221 or visit http://www.farmsanctuary.org to register today.

(More below the fold…)

Farm Sanctuary: Roll in the Hay for Farm Animals

Sunday, May 18th, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Natalie Bowman
Date: Wed, May 7, 2008 at 2:00 PM
Subject: Roll in the Hay for Farm Animals

Hi again Kelly,

Here’s some fun news to share with fellow compassionate consumers, if you’d like: Farm Sanctuary and A Scent of Scandal, a celebrated Los Angeles candle company, are thrilled to announce the release of “A Roll in the Hay,” an earth-, animal- and people-friendly soy wax candle to benefit farm animal rescue. A press release with more details follows.

Cheers,

Natalie Bowman
Communications Manager
Farm Sanctuary
P.O. Box 150, Watkins Glen, NY 14891
PH: 607-583-2225 ext. 250

Learn about our shelter residents and take action on their behalf — sign up for our alerts and online newsletter today!
http://www.farmsanctuary.org/member/

Farm Sanctuary
Rescue, Education, Advocacy
http://www.farmsanctuary.org
A compassionate world begins with you.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Natalie Bowman, Farm Sanctuary, 607-583-2225 ext. 250,
nbowman [at] farmsanctuary.org
Ari Solomon, A Scent of Scandal, 323-896-2034, ari [at] ascentofscandal.com

A Scent of Scandal Invites Customers to “Roll in the Hay” for Farm Sanctuary

Cruelty-free Candle Company Releases New Creation to Benefit Leading Farm Animal Advocacy Group

LOS ANGELES, Calif. – May 7, 2008 – A Scent of Scandal, a Los Angeles-based company celebrated for its clever and classy cruelty-free candles, has unveiled a new creation: a candle called “A Roll in the Hay,” launched to raise funds for and awareness about Farm Sanctuary, the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization. Fifteen percent of every “A Roll in the Hay” sale will be donated directly to Farm Sanctuary.

(More below the fold…)

Slaughterhouse Rescues Find Sanctuary at California Shelters

Monday, May 5th, 2008

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Natalie Bowman
Date: Mon, May 5, 2008 at 4:14 PM
Subject: Slaughterhouse Rescues Find Sanctuary at California Shelters

Hi Kelly,

Farm Sanctuary and Animal Place, a nonprofit sanctuary for farm animals, are now coming to the aid of 14 animals seized from a Watsonville, Calif. slaughterhouse- whose owner is now being charged with cruelty and investigated by the state Department of Agriculture.

I have included a press release below with further details, in case you are interested in posting on the story.

Warm regards,

Natalie Bowman
Communications Manager
Farm Sanctuary
P.O. Box 150, Watkins Glen, NY 14891
PH: 607-583-2225 ext. 250
http://www.farmsanctuary.org

P.S. Farm Sanctuary has just offered refuge to six more goats from the slaughterhouse, including two new mothers and their twin kids.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Natalie Bowman, Farm Sanctuary, 607-583-2225 ext. 250, nbowman [at] farmsanctuary.org Marji Beach, Animal Place, 707-449-4814, marji [at] animalplace.org

Animals Confiscated from Slaughterhouse Find Refuge at California Sanctuaries

Farm Sanctuary and Animal Place Shelter Neglected, Sick and Injured Animals from Watsonville Abattoir

Orland, CA and Vacaville, CA – May 5, 2008 – Farm Sanctuary, which operates the largest rescue and refuge network for farm animals in North America, and Animal Place, a nonprofit sanctuary for abused and discarded farmed animals, have responded to a call from Santa Cruz Animal Services and are coming to the aid of 14 neglected animals confiscated from a Watsonville, Calif. slaughterhouse on Thursday, May 1.

The rescued animals-12 goats, one cow and one sheep-were discovered at the Lee Road slaughter facility on Thursday, May 1 by Todd Stosuy of Santa Cruz Animal Services, when he noticed a cow with a bloody horn from the road and initiated an investigation. Stosuy said that in addition to the injured cow, he found 12 very ill, malnourished goats with overgrown, rotted hoofs, as well as several other animals who would have perished if he had not intervened. Upon returning to the facility on Saturday, May 3, Stosuy seized eight more goats and another sheep whose health had deteriorated since his last visit; the sanctuaries and Animal Services are arranging placement of these animals. According to Stosuy, all of the rescued animals were either acquired by the owner at auction or raised on the property and were to be hand-picked by and slaughtered for local customers.

(More below the fold…)

Farm Sanctuary Mourns Loss of Founding Resident

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008

There are also a few photos of Opie on Flickr, and on Farm Sanctuary’s website here. So sad, his passing is, but at least he only knew a few hours of human cruelty, followed by 18 years of bliss at Farm Sanctuary. Dog bless, sweet boy.

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Farm Sanctuary – info [at] farmsanctuary.org
Date: Wed, Apr 2, 2008 at 5:00 PM
Subject: Farm Sanctuary Mourns Loss of Founding Resident

Farm Sanctuary Mourns Loss of Founding Resident

On a cold day 18 years ago, a tiny calf, no more than a few hours old, was abandoned and left for dead at a stockyard in upstate New York. A dairy industry discard too weak and sickly to even stand, the male Holstein lay helpless in an obscure alleyway, where few signs of life emanated from him—let alone any indication of the magnificent creature he was destined to become.

Saved at the last hour by Gene Baur, then a young activist, the downer calf was named Opie and brought to live at Farm Sanctuary, a seedling operation at the time, which sheltered far fewer animals and was run only by its founders and a handful of volunteers. Here, Opie, who when rescued had a temperature too low to even register on a thermometer, was placed on an IV, given colostrums and bottle-fed ‘round the clock until he was well enough to integrate with the other cattle.

On the happy day he was introduced to his new herd mates, Opie was adopted within moments by the now 21-year-old Maya, also one of the first downer calves ever rescued by Farm Sanctuary. Under the cow’s watchful eye, Opie, like the organization—which kept building more barns, laying more fencing and making its name known throughout the nation—grew, and then grew some more.

Standing more than six feet tall and weighing about a ton and a half in his prime, Opie, who blossomed into the benevolent, paternal leader of our cattle herd, was an awe-inspiring sight to behold. Visitors, most of whom were at first rendered speechless by and, often, a little fearful of the massive steer, were reassured when they approached Opie and learned that he had a heart that matched his size. No one made an impression quite like Opie did.

Gentle, warm and receptive to any and all affection he was offered by admirers, Opie’s dramatic rescue story, seemingly miraculous recovery, radiant personality, and powerful presence helped build the very foundation for our visitor program and proved what a difference our animal ambassadors could make for others of their species. It is impossible to know exactly how many people this magnanimous animal turned vegan, but Opie, once forgotten by a cruel industry, was clearly adored throughout his life by thousands, who were changed for the better from having known him.

Off the farm, Opie’s compelling before and after rescue photos were presented at legislative sessions, distributed widely on Farm Sanctuary activist materials, and picked up by media throughout the nation, leading to such advances as the introduction of the Downed Animal Protection Act in the U.S. Congress in 1992. The face of our No Downers Campaign (http://www.nodowners.org/), Opie and his story continued to help us shed light on the critical need for legislation to prevent the marketing and slaughter of animals too weak and sick to walk on their own and advocate for measures to prevent their suffering long after his rescue.

(More below the fold…)

Farm Sanctuary’s Country Hoe Down (May 3-4, 2008)

Tuesday, March 18th, 2008

Mark your calendars, Californians – Farm Sanctuary’s CA Country Hoe Down is scheduled for the weekend of May 3-4 this year. Speaking as a native New Yorker living in the midwest, I can say that you East Coast/West Coats veg*ns don’t know how lucky y’all are! Now go register, people.

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Natalie Bowman
Date: Tue, Mar 18, 2008 at 12:47 PM
Subject: Listing for Farm Sanctuary’s Country Hoe Down

Hi Kelly,

Below is a calendar listing for Farm Sanctuary’s annual Country Hoe Down at our Orland, California Shelter. We would be very appreciative if you are able to post and help us raise awareness about this inspirational and educational event for farm animal advocates.

Please let me know if you would like more information.

Warm Regards,

Natalie Bowman
Communications Coordinator
Farm Sanctuary
P.O. Box 150, Watkins Glen, NY 14891
PH: 607-583-2225 ext. 250

Learn about our shelter residents and take action on their behalf — sign up for our alerts and online newsletter today!
http://www.farmsanctuary.org/member/

Farm Sanctuary
Rescue, Education, Advocacy
http://www.farmsanctuary.org
A compassionate world begins with you.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR LISTING

Contact: Natalie Bowman, 607-583-2225 ext. 250, nbowman [at] farmsanctuary.org

Yee-haw! It’s Country Hoe Down Time at Farm Sanctuary’s California Shelter

Orland, CA – March 14, 2008 – Join Farm Sanctuary for a rootin’ tootin’ weekend of animal-friendly festivities at our annual California Country Hoe Down. This educational and inspirational event offers practical information and advice for animal advocates and features fun activities that will allow guests to enjoy the company of our rescued farm animals and each other.

The schedule of events includes presentations from Farm Sanctuary President and Co-founder Gene Baur, Compassionate Cooks Founder Colleen Patrick-Goudreau and author Mark Hawthorne, as well as a catered vegan dinner, sanctuary time with the animals, hayrides, cooking demonstrations, and a barn dance with complimentary refreshments and live entertainment.

WHEN: Saturday and Sunday, May 3 and 4, 2008

WHERE: Farm Sanctuary, 19080 Newville Rd., Orland, CA

REGISTRATION: Registration costs $35 per person and includes a catered dinner Saturday evening. Deadline for registration is April 25, 2008. Call 607-583-2225 ext. 221 or visit http://www.farmsanctuary.org to register today.

About Farm Sanctuary

Photo via Farm Sanctuary

Farm Sanctuary is the nation’s leading farm animal protection organization. Since incorporating in 1986, we have worked to expose and stop cruel practices of the “food animal” industry through research and investigations, legal and legislative actions, public awareness projects, youth education, and direct rescue and refuge efforts. Our shelters in Watkins Glen, N.Y., and Orland, Calif., provide lifelong care for hundreds of rescued animals, who have become ambassadors for farm animals everywhere by educating visitors about the realities of factory farming. More information can be found at http://www.farmsanctuary.org or by calling 607-583-2225.

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