Spay Day USA!

Tuesday, February 26th, 2008

My name is Susan Daffron and I’m the founder of the National Association of Pet Rescue Professionals (http://www.naprp.com) and the author of books on caring for adopted dogs and cats called Happy Hound (http://www.happyhoundbook.com) and Happy Tabby (http://www.happytabbybook.com).

Spay Day is February 26, this year and I thought I’d share a list of reasons why it’s so important to “fix” your pets because so many myths continue to exist when it comes to spaying and neutering. Here are three facts:

1. Spayed or neutered animals are healthier. Female cats and dogs can’t get uterine or ovarian cancer and the possibility that the animal will get breast cancer is greatly reduced. Neutering reduces roaming and fighting and most animals lose the desire to constantly mark their territory.

2. Spayed or neutered animals live longer. Statistically, animals that have been spayed or neutered live an average of two to three years longer than unsterilized pets.

3. Spaying or neutering saves money. Spaying is a one-time cost that is tiny when compared to the cost of providing care for a mother and a litter (or litters!) of puppies or kittens.

It’s a myth that it’s good to let a pet have “just one litter” of puppies or kittens before you get her spayed. The bottom line is that by letting your pet have that “just one litter” you contribute to the problem of pet overpopulation. Even if you find homes for the puppies or kittens, those critters produce more critters and the problem grows exponentially and quickly. One cat or dog who has babies and whose babies have babies can be responsible for the birth of 50 to 200 kittens or puppies in just one year. The reproductive rate of dogs is 15 times that of humans and the reproductive rate of cats is 30 times that of humans.

Virtually every pet rescue requires that adopted pets be spayed or neutered. These people work tirelessly to save animals every day, so do your part to help them help the animals. Spay and neuter your pets!

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Susan Daffron’s Recipe for Vegan Success

Wednesday, February 20th, 2008

Greetings Easy Vegan readers!

My name is Susan Daffron and I’m the author of a book called Vegan Success: Scrumptious, Healthy Vegan Recipes for Busy People (http://www.vegansuccess.com).

First a big thank you to Kelly for letting me do a guest post. The subject of this blog is one that I certainly am interested in, since it’s basically what our whole cookbook is about! We wrote it because after we went vegan in 1994, we struggled to find recipes that didn’t take forever to make. We’re aren’t exactly gourmet chefs, but we wanted to eat yummy food that we could make after a long day at work when we didn’t feel like cooking.

When you’re vegan, another thing you always (always!!) hear is that being vegan is too “hard” and that you’ll never get enough protein. (Even my mother said this…but then she also was worried that drinking carrot juice would turn me orange; no worries Mom, I never drank that much juice.)

Anyway, getting enough protein when you are vegetarian is easy. Many plant foods are quite high in protein, including beans, nuts, grains and various vegetables, such as broccoli and potatoes. Even carrots contain protein. Tofu contains 10-20 grams of protein and the wide range of soy foods available now are an easy way to incorporate plenty of protein in your diet.

Realistically, technically French fries are vegetarian. If you live on French fries, you won’t be healthy. The key to eating a healthy balanced diet is to eat a wide variety of different foods. When we go to the grocery store, we spend a lot of time in the produce aisle. The more different vegetables and grains you eat, the easier it is to maintain good health.

If you’re struggling for ideas on what to make for dinner, check out our book. It specializes in healthy easy recipes. You can see a few on this page:

http://www.vegansuccess.com/recipe.htm

and a few more on another one of our Web sites:

http://www.manyveggierecipes.com

Enjoy!

Susan

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