PETA: Tell Lowe’s No More Glue Traps!

Friday, September 19th, 2008

If you need some background on the issue, previous alerts are available here, here and here.

For more on humane methods of mouse control, please see a series of articles I wrote on the subject:

How to Tell If There’s a Mouse in Your House (Article 1 of 3)

How to Mouse-Proof Your House (Article 2 of 3)

Spare the Snap-Trap and Have Mercy on the Mice (Article 3 of 3)

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: PETA
Date: Tue, Sep 16, 2008 at 4:27 PM
Subject: Skin Ripped Off and Left to Suffocate – Tell Lowe’s No More Glue Traps!

Thank you for participating in the action alert that targets Lowe’s for its sale of cruel glue traps. I’m sure that you received Lowe’s automated response, which stated, “We…have changed our merchandise offering to cut in half the number of glue traps we offer, and only carry the products that contain Eugenol, which is an anesthetic.”

Unfortunately, Eugenol can only act as an anesthetic when injected directly into an animal’s bloodstream or given through a tube into the stomach. Topical application—which is how animals caught in glue traps would come into contact with Eugenol—would not result in any pain relief whatsoever. In fact, it could cause the animals to experience an additional painful burning sensation, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and seizures. These “modified” glue traps are every bit as cruel as standard glue traps.

Please contact Lowe’s at 1-800-445-6937 and let them know that Eugenol does nothing to ease the suffering of animals caught in glue traps. Also ask that they stop selling all glue traps immediately.

Thank you for everything that you do for animals.

Sincerely,

Emily Allen
Special Assistant to the Vice President
Cruelty Investigations Division
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

If you received this message from a friend, you can sign up for PETA’s Online Community.

This e-mail was sent by:
PETA
501 Front St., Norfolk, VA 23510
United States

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Product Review: Smart Mouse Trap / Humane Mousetrap

Thursday, January 3rd, 2008

2011-06-24 - Olive Oil Mouse - 0013

This little bugger invaded our liquor cabinet – and went straight for the lone bottle of olive oil. She must be straight edge!
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The Smartest Mouse House, Paws Down!

five out of five stars

Why Opt for Non-lethal Methods of Rodent Control?

Traditional methods of rodent control, including rodenticides and traps, are lethal to mice and largely unsafe for humans. Rodenticides are pesticides that are designed to kill rodents. However, when ingested, they can also prove deadly to companion animals, as well as other wildlife and even children. Nor are they good for the environment; Americans are so fond of pesticides that they can now be found in our surface and ground water and soil. In fact, pesticides even find their way into the food chain! Moreover, the cumulative toxicity of pesticides is such a concern that the Environmental Protection Agency discourages homeowners from using pesticides before trying preventative strategies.

Lethal traps, while not harmful to humans, prove to be a torturous, barbaric death for those mice unlucky enough to find themselves caught in one. Mice trapped on “glue boards” usually starve to death – or may actually gnaw off a limb in order to escape. Likewise, those mice caught in “box” or “multiple” traps will suffer a slow death due to starvation – assuming that the trap isn’t baited with poisons, of course. “Snap” or “spring” traps don’t necessarily provide for a quick death and may merely injure Mickey.

The Smartest Mouse House on the Market

After having a highly unsuccessful and frustrating run with the Victor Live Catch Mouse Traps – which are less expensive than the Smart Mouse Trap model, but also less effective – I caved in and shelled out over $100 for a dozen of the pricier humane traps. They quickly proved to be worth the extra money, and then some: Unlike the solid grey plastic Victor traps, they’re easy to set, don’t slam shut at random, and are made of semi-transparent green plastic, so you can easily glance inside in order to gauge your success. That first year, I caught dozens of little guys, all of which I released back into the fields (I’ve always wondered whether I trapped the same mouse twice!). Although I still get out the trusty Smart Traps every winter, the guests all seem to have departed.

When setting the traps, you must take the mice’s behavior into consideration. Place the traps alongside walls, in storage areas, and next to objects. Leaving them in the middle of a large room would prove pointless, as mice will rarely travel across wide, open spaces. Leave the traps in areas where you’ve noticed a large concentration of droppings or chew marks. Mice rarely travel more than 30 feet from their nests, so concentrate your efforts in the areas where there appears to be activity. Place several traps together for maximum effectiveness. Remember, the more traps, the better – so buy in bulk! You can bait them with any number of food or nesting materials, such as peanut butter, chocolate chips, cereal, nuts, or cotton balls. (However, you should avoid chocolate if you have canine companions – caffeine and theobtomine, both present in chocolate, can prove fatal to dogs.)

Of course, you must be able to check the traps daily; “catch-and-release” traps left unattended are just as lethal as regular box traps! Make the rounds at least once (if not, twice) a day. Establish a schedule and record the location of each trap, if necessary. If you do happen upon an unwitting inmate, either release him outside as soon as possible, or – if the temperatures are dangerously low – keep him a thick plastic box (one with high “walls” and sans lid, naturally!) until it’s safe outside. I find that a medium-sized plastic Tupperware storage box, lined with rags and stocked with cereal and water, works well.

Happy catch-and-releasing!

(Note: The “Smart Mouse Traps” are also referred to as “Humane Mouse Traps” or “Smart Mouse Houses”; though the name differs, they all have a distinct “house” shape and are constructed of semi-transparent green plastic.)

(This review was originally published on Amazon. Please click through and vote it helpful if you think it so!)

I could not resist.

Friday, December 21st, 2007

C’mon, it’s the Friday before a holiday weekend. Like you’re not screwing around.

funny pictures
moar funny pictures

(More below the fold…)

Spare the Snap-Trap and Have Mercy on the Mice (Article 3 of 3)

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007

While I was disassembling my old blog today, it occurred to me that I never crossposted a few articles I wrote about humane methods of “pest” control from there to here. So, here they be…two years late, but still totally in season. With updated links, to boot.

The articles in this particular series include:
1 – How to Tell If There’s a Mouse in Your House
2 – How to Mouse-Proof Your House: A Natural, Humane, and Effective Form of Pest Control
3 – Spare the Snap-Trap and Have Mercy on the Mice: A Guide to “Catch-and-Release” Mouse Traps

Teh fine print: You’re permitted – nay, encouraged! – to reprint these articles elsewhere, as long as all links remain intact and clickable, and the resource box is included at the bottom of the page.

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Spare the Snap-Trap and Have Mercy on the Mice: A Guide to “Catch-and-Release” Mouse Traps
By Kelly Garbato

Summer is slowly winding down; the little ones are back in school, and each day brings with it a slightly chillier frost. Just as you’re preparing to hunker down for the winter, your furry neighbors are plotting to invade your home. If you don’t act quickly, your house could quickly be overrun with – mice!

Though you might be tempted to turn to lethal traps at the first sign of company, now’s not the time to resort to toxic or lethal devices, which serve as an attractive “quick fix.” Rather than relying on poisons or lethal traps – neither of which are natural or humane – consider buying “catch-and-release” live traps instead.

(More below the fold…)

How to Mouse-Proof Your House (Article 2 of 3)

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007

While I was disassembling my old blog today, it occurred to me that I never crossposted a few articles I wrote about humane methods of “pest” control from there to here. So, here they be…two years late, but still totally in season. With updated links, to boot.

The articles in this particular series include:
1 – How to Tell If There’s a Mouse in Your House
2 – How to Mouse-Proof Your House: A Natural, Humane, and Effective Form of Pest Control
3 – Spare the Snap-Trap and Have Mercy on the Mice: A Guide to “Catch-and-Release” Mouse Traps

Teh fine print: You’re permitted – nay, encouraged! – to reprint these articles elsewhere, as long as all links remain intact and clickable, and the resource box is included at the bottom of the page.

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How to Mouse-Proof Your House: A Natural, Humane, and Effective Form of Pest Control
By Kelly Garbato

It happens every fall; at the first signs of frost, you start to hear mysterious squeaking and scratching noises emanating from your attic. Within weeks, you find wood shavings beneath the garage door. By November, you have already been forced to throw out three boxes of perfectly good cereal because of the conspicuous teeth marks at the bottom of the bags. Once you find the first pile of droppings, there’s no doubt about it – you have company!

Although it’s oftentimes difficult to rid your home of mice once they’ve taken hold, it can be done. However, there is a better way. The old saying that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is applicable in this case. Rather than trying to round up and kick out Mickey, Minnie, and their offspring, why not just stop them from gaining entry in the first place?

Mouse-proofing your house is easier than it sounds. First you will need to sanitize your environment, and then you must seal it up so that it stays sanitary.

(More below the fold…)

How to Tell If There’s a Mouse in Your House (Article 1 of 3)

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007

While I was disassembling my old blog today, it occurred to me that I never crossposted a few articles I wrote about humane methods of “pest” control from there to here. So, here they be…two years late, but still totally in season. With updated links, to boot.

The articles in this particular series include:
1 – How to Tell If There’s a Mouse in Your House
2 – How to Mouse-Proof Your House: A Natural, Humane, and Effective Form of Pest Control
3 – Spare the Snap-Trap and Have Mercy on the Mice: A Guide to “Catch-and-Release” Mouse Traps

Teh fine print: You’re permitted – nay, encouraged! – to reprint these articles elsewhere, as long as all links remain intact and clickable, and the resource box is included at the bottom of the page.

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How to Tell If There’s a Mouse in Your House
By Kelly Garbato

You’ve just settled down in bed and are twenty minutes into Letterman when you hear it: a light scratching overhead, accompanied by a squeak here and a squeal there. You assume that it’s the wind making strange noises (after all, it is windy tonight!), or perhaps the house is just settling (you do live in an older home, so it would make sense…). Maybe the sounds are just the result of an overactive imagination. You hope!

Of course, you just can’t get around the obvious conclusion – you have company. Whether it’s a bird, a bat, a squirrel, or an entire family of mice, there’s something up there. Given that you’ve had recurrent rodent problems, the latter option is probably the safest bet.

However, how can you be sure what type of animal you’re dealing with – assuming that you even have unwelcome visitors at all? Before you can evict them, you need to know who “they” are.

Above all else, your first step is to inspect your home for signs of mice. Different problems call for different solutions; if your visitors are actually squirrels instead of mice, you’ll need to develop a different strategy.

(More below the fold…)