Book Review: Not a Drop to Drink, Mindy McGinnis (2013)

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

A stunning debut!

five out of five stars

Caution: minor spoilers ahead. Also, trigger warning for discussions of rape.

Water, water, every where,
Nor any drop to drink.

More than just two lines dreamed up by a long-dead poet, this mantra rules sixteen-year-old Lynn’s life. Born into a world in which fresh, potable water is a scarcity, Lynn and Mother (less commonly known as “Lauren”) guard their pond as though their lives depend on it – because they do. Daily tasks revolve around gathering water, purifying water, storing water, and guarding water from threats both real and imagined. Anyone, human or non, who ventures too close to the pond is shot on sight. If they’re lucky, they get a warning shot first. When not performing daily chores, Lynn and Mother while away their time on the roof, a strategic vantage point from which to spot and discourage intruders.

For more than a decade and a half, Lynn’s life is confined to this small universe: the pond, the roof, and the basement. Mother is her only companion, and aside from the one time their neighbor Stebbs nearly lost a foot in a bear trap and sought Lauren’s help, Lynns hasn’t spoken to another soul. That is, until the fateful fall day when Mother is killed by a pack of especially bold coyotes. Though she attempts to carry on the way Mother taught her, Lynn finds herself sucked into local affairs by Stebbs. Stebbs has something Mother could never afford – a conscience – and he enlists Lynn’s assistance in helping the “Streamers,” a group of expats from the city of Entargo who set up camp upstream from Lynn and Stebbs.

A dearth of fresh water is only one of their problems, as the group will soon discover; more dangerous than the threat of cholera are the men to the south, who make due by looting abandoned houses, stealing from fellow survivors, and kidnapping, enslaving, and raping/prostituting women. They run a trading post in the nearby city of South Bloomfield, where a gallon of gas will get you a half hour with one of their sex slaves, and women can barter their bodies for milk with which to feed their starving children (stolen from the exploited body of a dairy cow, whose own child remains conspicuously absent). When the group attempted to raid Lynn’s house, she and Mother shot several of them dead. Now that Mother is gone, it’s up to Lynn to solve the Southie problem for good.

(More below the fold…)