Book Review: Dreamology, Lucy Keating (2016)

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Would make a most excellent ’80s teen movie!

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic ARC for review through Edelweiss.)

I MADE HIM up. At least that’s what I always told myself. The combination of all my childhood adorations, combined into one perfect guy. The trouble is, I was wrong. Because right now Max is sitting directly across the quad from me, reading our psych textbook and pausing every few minutes to type something on his phone. He’s wearing a heather-gray T-shirt and I want to go over and sit on his lap.

In this moment, watching Max, I picture my heart as one of Jane’s beloved fish. How many ways could it possibly be murdered before Max is through with me? I picture it now, swimming with a bunch of other little heart muscles down a stream, before they are all caught up in a net, jumping and wiggling around.

Alice and Max have been dreaming of each other since they were children. They’ve traveled the (dream) world together. They’ve had food fights at the Met; played games of Jenga with life-sized foam bricks; boogie boarded down Nan’s grand staircase; and dined on chocolate Legos (all the better to build castles with!). For the past eleven years, they’ve been the one constant, comforting, dependable thing in each others’ lives. Ever since Alice’s mom abandoned the family to study primates in Uganda (and then Madagascar), and Max’s older sister Lila died in a drunk driving accident. Ever since the nightmares began, and their parents enrolled them in the brain mapping study at the Center for Dream Discovery.

Dreams and reality collide when Alice’s father moves the family back to Boston and into her recently deceased Nan’s two-hundred-year-old townhouse. For there, standing in the doorway of her Psych 201 class at Bennett Academy, is Alice’s dream boy. There are just three teeny tiny little problems, though: 1) Max refuses to acknowledge their connection; 2) and already has an IRL girlfriend named Celeste; and 3) as their waking and sleeping lives intersect, Alice and Max begin to have trouble distinguishing reality from fantasy.

Alice is convinced that the answers are hidden in the files of the seemingly-sketchy Dr. Petermann, and the research he conducted on them all those years ago. With the help of Max; her NYC BFF Sophie; and her new Boston bud, Oliver, can Lucy set things right – without sacrificing the boy of her dreams?

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Book Review: A Bollywood Affair, Sonali Dev (2014)

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

A Fun, Sometimes Over-the-Top Madcap Bollywood Romance

three out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free book for review through Goodreads’s First Reads program. Also, there are clearly marked spoilers towards the end of this review. Trigger warning for rape and child abuse.)

Like tens of millions of her peers, Malvika “Mili” Rathod is a child bride.* In a bargain struck by her grandmother and the groom’s grandfather, Mili was married off at the age of four; she has spent the past twenty years waiting for her husband to return to Balpur and claim her.

Unfortunately, hers was not a meeting of the minds, in even the loosest sense of the term: a year after the marriage, her betrothed’s mother packed up Virat and his younger brother Samir and moved the family to Nagpur, away from the clutches of their abusive and controlling grandfather. Not long after, Lata sent notice to the Balpur village council to have the marriage annulled; unbeknownst to the Rathods, grandfather retracted the paperwork. For the next two decades, he led Mili and her naani on, milking them for her dowry in exchange for empty promises that this would be the year that Virat – now a Squad Leader in the Indian Air Force – would send for her. Grandfather passed away several years ago, and naani is starting to panic: when she’s gone, who will care for her granddaughter?

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Mini-Review: Destiny, K.C. Maguire (2012)

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Boy Buys Girl, Girl Evolves

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic copy of this story for review through Library Thing’s Member Giveaways program. Also, the last paragraph contains a vague spoiler.)

“What’s the point of a new generation if we can live forever?” And there it is. My whole problem with the Transition. Truthfully, I always wanted kids. But Tara didn’t…and Destiny can’t. So what’s the point?

When Joe’s wife Tara leaves him after more than a decade of marriage, he does what many middle-aged, newly-single men of the future do: he buys a companionship android. At first glance, the T-26 known as Destiny might seem to be at odds with Joe’s longstanding resistance to the Transition – in which one’s consciousness is downloaded into a synthetic version of one’s body; everybody’s doing it! – but Destiny is a true android: preprogrammed with a variety of factory settings (Erotic, Housewife), she lacks any humanity of her own. Whereas Joe’s Transitioned friends are constant reminders of the crumbling wall between “human” and “machine,” Destiny is 100%, honest to goodness not-human.

Much like his plasma screen tv and toaster oven, Destiny is just another one of Joe’s toys. Until the day she isn’t. Destiny begins to learn. Evolve. Becomes sentient.

As Joe finds himself falling in love with an android, he must decide what’s more important to him: his humanity, increasingly rare these days – or eternal love.

Smart and full of heart, Destiny is a fun and quick read – a little too quick, if you ask me. I’d love to see this story expanded in novel form. The Habitat Facility is a nice touch, and it’s interesting to observe how Joe’s behavior parallels that of some nonhuman animals kept in confinement (pandas, for example, are notoriously reluctant to mate in zoos, leading to the rise of panda porn).

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

Book Review: Third Daughter (The Dharian Affairs, Book One), Susan Kaye Quinn (2013)

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Hella Fun!

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free electronic copy of this book for review through Library Thing’s Member Giveaways program.)

As the Third Daughter of Dharia, Aniri enjoys a luxury which was denied her older sisters: on her 18th birthday, she’s free to marry for love instead of country. First in the line of succession, Aniri’s oldest sister Nahali has been groomed from birth to become Queen; fittingly, she arranged to marry a Dharian nobleman (whom she just so happened to love). Meanwhile, middle sister Seledri married a Samirian prince in order to further the alliance between her country and his (sadly, the prince’s love for Seledri is as of yet unrequited).

With no interests left to further, Aniri happily awaits the day when she’ll be able to marry her lover Devesh, a courtesan and fencing instructor from Samir. Then they will travel the world in search of the Samirian robbers who murdered her father the King some eight years ago.

Naturally, a wrench finds its way into Aniri’s plans – in the form of Ashoka Malik, the barbarian prince of Jungali. After the untimely deaths of his mother and younger brother, Prince Malik – “Ash” to his friends – finds himself in charge of a fractured country. Comprised of four provinces, the mountain country is mired in poverty and fraught with infighting, particularly as at least one of the provinces’ generals play at a military coup. Rumors of a Jungali flying machine run rampant, and war seems inevitable. Hoping that his marriage to a Dharian Prince will cultivate a powerful alliance and unite his people behind him, Prince Malik proposes a peace-brokering marriage to the Queen. Unfortunately for Aniri, she is the only single daughter left.

And that’s just the first few chapters! (I won’t say more because I’d rather not spoil the story, but suffice it to say that nothing is as it seems.)

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