Book Review: Herding Cats (Sarah’s Scribbles #3) by Sarah Andersen (2018)

Tuesday, March 27th, 2018

Amazing, as always.

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free ARC for review through NetGalley.)

Sarah Andersen is my favorite, and Herding Cats – the third in her Sarah’s Scribbles series – does not disappoint. Her trademark adorable line drawings, self-deprecating humor, and wry wit are all present and accounted for. While Sarah’s observations run the gamut, from popular trends to personal apocalypses, Herding Cats is all about the three As: anxiety, animals, and art. Err, make that four: can’t forget about adulting, filed under “things that are impossible and threaten to break me on the daily.” (I feel you, girl. I’ve cried three times and counting, just today.)

The last section includes advice to aspiring artists, punctuated by pithy comic strips for the rest of us. I was not bored.

Some of the comics I remembered from her twitter feed, but many were new, or at least new-to-me. Nearly are all instant classics. But since I can’t very well post the entire book, here are the top five.

In sum: Buy this book. Buy it meow.

(This review is also available on Amazon, Library Thing, and Goodreads. Please click through and vote it helpful if you’re so inclined!)

Book Review: Adulthood is a Myth: A "Sarah’s Scribbles" Collection, Sarah Andersen (2016)

Friday, March 4th, 2016

Not Just for Millennials!

five out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-book for review through NetGalley.)

Are you a special snowflake? Do you love networking to advance your career? Have you never wasted a fresh new day surfing the internet? Ugh. This book is not for you. Please go away.

This book is for the rest of us. These comics document the wasting of entire beautiful weekends on the internet, the unbearable agony of holding hands on the street with a gorgeous guy, dreaming all day of getting home and back into pajamas, and wondering when, exactly, this adulthood thing begins. In other words, the horrors and awkwardness of young modern life.

I’m 37 years old (emphasis on old) and am still waiting for the day when it feels like I’ve crossed over into adulthood. My lack of human kids doesn’t help, but you’d think my dog kids (both rescue and foster) would help get me at least halfway there. But I prefer sweatpants to jeans (skirts and slacks, what?), never carry a purse (though will stoop to a tote bag if absolutely necessary, like when begging fistfuls of free sample meds from the dermatologist), and wear sports bras exclusively (but only if I must). Last summer our water got shut off for a day because I didn’t realize that the city, in its infinite wisdom (i.e. laziness), had ceased its direct deposit payment plan and now requires all bills to be paid by cash or check. I have a bachelor’s degree that’s probably too old to mean anything anymore, and am still trying to figure out what I want to do when I grow up with my life.

In short, Sarah Andersen might be a Millennial, but I can still relate to much of what’s in Adulthood is a Myth.

Like, any one of these could be an illustration in my (definitely not best-selling) autobiography.

(More below the fold…)