Simple is Good!

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

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A hearty shout-out to Avery, which sent me a copy of one of its upcoming vegan titles: Simple Recipes for Joy: More Than 200 Delicious Vegan Recipes by Sharon Gannon, the founder of Jivamukti Yoga and the Jivamuktea Café.

As much as I love the book’s Mad Hatter-styled cover, I positively adore the photo on the back of the dust jacket, which shows the proprietor beaming from the Café’s front counter, standing right in front of a chalk board jam packed with the names of delicious vegan dishes. SO MUCH VEGAN FOOD.

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Burrito Verdura, I want!

This bad boy doesn’t go on sale for more than a month – September 16th, to be exact – but sadly I don’t think I’ll get to do any cooking from it until after then anyway, on account of VeganMoFo, for which I have a theme. A carefully planned, flawlessly executed, hopefully epic theme. (Hint: it involves lots of waffles and all the bacon and eggs you have.)

BUT. I might have to make an exception for the Angel Hair Pasta with Creamy Lemon-Zucchini Sauce, seeing as I have at least ten pounds of zukes sitting on my countertop this very moment. And that’s not counting the half a dozen maturing in the garden. A girl can eat only so many Baked Zucchini Sticks, you know? (By which I mean ALL the zucchini sticks. They’re kind of amazing.)

New swag from Columbia University Press!

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

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The nice folks at Columbia University Press recently sent me not one, but two new books on human animal studies: Animals and the Human Imagination: A Companion to Animal Studies, edited by Aaron Gross and Anne Vallely and Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now? by Kari Weil. They both look rather interesting, though I think it’s Kari Weil who will get bumped to the top of my towering book pile. Under the likes of Margaret Atwood and Ursula K. Le Guin, that is. (Hey, it’s summer! The season of bottomless margaritas and light reading!)

(More below the fold…)

furkid friday: dogs and books (and books about dogs)

Friday, June 3rd, 2011

Today we have an extra-special furkid friday/Shout Out two-fer! (Dogs and books, books and dogs; throw in pizza and netflix, and that’s all you really need in life, amirite folks?) I even redesigned the old Colbert Report SHOUT OUT! graphic for the occasion!

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Animated gifs, they’re all the rage. Alas, I was lazy and in a hurry and only used four frames for this one, so it’s a bit choppy. But still, animated Stephen! Times two!

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The props go to Columbia University Press, which kindly sent me a copy of Creaturely Poetics: Animality and Vulnerability in Literature and Film by Anat Pick, a senior lecturer in film and program leader for film and video: theory and practice at the University of East London. From the book’s back cover:

Exploring the “logic of flesh” and the use of the body to mark species identity, Anat Pick reimagines a poetics that begins with the vulnerability of bodies, not the omnipotence of thought. Pick proposes a “creaturely” approach based on the shared embodiedness of humans and animals and a postsecular perspective on human-animal relations. She turns to literature, film, and other cultural texts, challenging the familiar inventory of the human: consciousness, language, morality, and dignity. Elaborating on such themes as witnessing, commemoration, and collective memory, Pick identifies the animal within all humans, emphasizing the corporeal and its issues of power and freedom. Through her poetics of the creaturely, powerlessness is the point at which aesthetic and ethical thinking must begin.

This looks like an interesting read for those concerned with how portrayals of nonhumans in pop culture – literature, film, television – both reflect and inform societal attitudes and ethics towards our fellow sentient beings. (In other words, me!) If you’d like to learn more, check out the book’s listing on Columbia University Press.

I tried my best to snap a photo of Peedee and/or O-Ren with Creaturely Poetics – mock reading it, or some such other cutesy silliness – but neither was feeling very cooperative. (Too hot!)

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That’s okay, though; truth be told, I wasn’t trying that hard anyway. (TOO HOT! Seriously, have I mentioned how hot it’s been lately? We’re looking at a week of 90 degree weather with 70%+ humidity. Ick!)

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randomness: dicks, donuts, girls, books, ice creams, pigs and pizzas!

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

Fan Junk Shots - Ralphie 01

  • www.schlongs4seals.com is now open and ready for business!

    Currently, only the blog – where I’ve already logged more posts in August than I managed to write for this here blog in the entire month of July – is fully functional. I’m still working on the promised interactive photo gallery and discussion features, but hope to have these done soon. (To this end, WP-compatible software recommendations would be most appreciated!)

    That said, the template and static/informational pages are all finished and look, if I might say so myself, kickass. I found a template that mimics Facebook almost to a M (for misogyny, natch), so it’s almost like we never left. (And by “left” I mean “were kicked off.”)

    Additionally, I created a temporary set of photo pages to house all the “man meat” I’ve “processed” thus far: VAPETA PSAs, promotional materials, junk shots, celebrity cock shots, South Park avatars, brother campaigns, etc. Browse, bookmark and check back often, because there’s more in the pipes.

    If you’re still out there and, um, excited to participate (excited! get it!?), send me your package at schlongs4seals [at] gmail.com and I’ll be equally excited (tee hee) to feature it on the appropriate page.

    Also, if you visit the front page, you’ll see a little Facebook “like” button in the left-hand sidebar (right under the hot white torso wearing the hot red boxer briefs). Click it, won’t you? We need friends! And sharing! On Facebook!

    Fan Junk Shots - Baby Kelly 02

    I’ve been a connoisseur of men’s briefs since early childhood.
    Behold the rapturous glee on my chubby chipmunk cheeks!
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    SeaL Shepherd may have succeeded in removing our page from Facebook, but he can hardly prevent us from sharing content in the form of links.

    Can’t stop the schlong, yo.

    (A note for the newbies and occasional readers: if all this cock talk has you flummoxed, go here for some background.)

  • Tofurky Pizza with Daiya Cheese has finally made its way to Kansas City!:

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    The Whole Foods in Overland Park, to be more specific. And now it’s in my freezer. Nom nom nom.

  • As if this isn’t already more awesomeness than the KC metro area can handle, Kansas City is now home to a brand-spanking-new vegan bakery. Gluten-free, to boot. And, if you live in the KC area, they deliver!

    Shane ordered a box of Golden Girls – the vegan feminist version of “real” Twinkies, if you will – for delivery to his office Monday.

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    They are super-yummy – a little denser than Twinkies (according to Shane; I’ve never partaken), with a sponge- or angel food cake-like consistency. The creamy filling is the bestest, though methinks the cakes could use more. I say the same of Ronald’s Donuts and Newman’s O’s, so grain of salt.

    Egads. In all my excitement, I almost forgot to name drop. Brody’s Bakery is the name of the biz – hit ’em up on Facebook, and if you’re ever in the KC area, shop team vegan, mkay? Jasmin of Our Hen House also did a nice writeup on Brody’s this week; see Brody’s Bakery Bakes Up Compassion. (Color me jealous, btw.)

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    Added to my book pile: The Death of the Animal

    Wednesday, April 15th, 2009

    Colbert Report Shout-Out

    A belated shout-out to Columbia University Press, who sent me a copy of Dr. Paola Cavalieri’s latest, The Death of the Animal: A Dialogue, a few weeks back. You may know of Dr. Cavalieri through The Animal Question: Why Non-Human Animals Deserve Human Rights (2001) and The Great Ape Project: Equality Beyond Humanity (1994), which she co-edited with Peter Singer.

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    The Death of the Animal looks to be an intriguing mix of philosophy, ethology, psychology and anthrozoology:

    While moral perfectionists rank conscious beings according to their cognitive abilities, Paola Cavalieri launches a more inclusive defense of all forms of subjectivity. In concert with Peter Singer, J. M. Coetzee, Harlan B. Miller, and other leading animal studies scholars, she expands our understanding of the nonhuman in such a way that the derogatory category of “the animal” becomes meaningless. In so doing, she presents a nonhierachical approach to ethics that better respects the value of the conscious self.

    The book was published in January, and is available on Amazon. Currently, it’s sitting at the bottom of a very large book pile, but I hope to read and review it – some time before the paperback edition is released, perhaps? I kid, I kid. By July, it’ll be so hot, it’ll be a chore just to peel myself off the couch – plenty of time for catching up on my reading!

    Until then, here’s some additional material to sink your teeth into, courtesy Philip at Columbia:

    Columbia University Press is pleased to announce the publication of The Death of the Animal: A Dialogue by Paola Cavalieri with Matthew Calarco, J. M. Coetzee, Harlan B. Miller, Cary Wolfe, and with a foreword by Peter Singer.

    The book sets these thinkers in a unique dialogue as they expand our understanding of the nonhuman through a discussion of the idea of the “animal,” ethics, moral perfectionism, and the value of the conscious self.

    We have also posted one of J. M. Coetzee’s responses in the book: “On Appetite, the Right to Life and Rational Ethics” as well as the Table of Contents.

    * I really need to grab a new Shout Out! screenshot, dontchathink?

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    Cooking, Contemplating with Lantern’s Books

    Wednesday, November 12th, 2008

    Colbert Report Shout-Out

    A hearty, hungry shout-out to Kara at Lantern Books, who recently sent me copies of How to Eat like a Vegetarian Even If You Never Want to Be One: More than 250 Shortcuts, Strategies, and Simple Solutions by Carol J. Adams and Patti Breitman and Look Two Ways on a One-Way Street: Food for Thought from the Founder of Candle Cafe and Candle 79 by Bart Potenza.

    Carol Adams, of course, is one of my favorite eco-feminist/veg*n feminist authors, so I’m eager to try out some of her favorite recipes. That, and I’m feeling a bit adventurous after last month’s VeganMoFo. And Bart Potenza’s little book of mind morsels sounds like just the thing to digest on a rainy, dreary Midwestern November afternoon. While perched in front of my sun lamp, natch.

    Keep an eye out for reviews, as well as the inevitable food porn.

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    Everywhere I look, more books!

    Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008

    Oh yays! The lovely Kara from Lantern Books sent me two ARCs (Advance Reading Copies), and I’m psyched about them both: Strategic Action for Animals by Melanie Joy and Social Creatures: A Human and Animal Studies Reader, edited by Clif Flynn.

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    Strategic Action looks as first glance as though it will make a nice supplement to Striking at the Roots, and Social Creatures is an anthology of essays on anthrozoology. So, yays all around!

    Lantern Books has a pretty interesting selection of new releases, not all of which deal with animal advocacy issues. For example, there’s a book on male aggression (Boys Will Be Boys) and another about the Columbine school shootings (No Easy Answers). So, go check ’em out. As of last month, they’re also on Library Thing – so if you’re an Early Reviewer (and, um wtf wouldn’t you be, you silly bird?), maybe you’ll be able to snag a Lantern book via LT. Last go-round they offered up 15 copies of Aftershock, with 321 members requesting a copy…not too shabby!

    I also treated myself to a few early birthday presents – a subscription to Veg News (The two-year subscription comes with a free tote, which is friggin massive. I should be able to cram an entire Whole Foods trip into it. Well, almost. All that Purely Decadent ice cream might put me over the top.), and three more books: The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (I was reading a library copy, but I ran out of renewals!), The Caged Virgin by Ayaan Hirsi Ali, and Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary, another anthology of essays.

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    Oh mans, I love book piles. Maybe a little too much.

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    Nothing brightens up a rainy day like free goodies!

    Sunday, February 3rd, 2008

    Yo! It’s time for another easyVegan Shout Out!

    Colbert Report Shout-Out

    This one’s to Mark Hawthorne, author of Striking at the Roots, who so graciously send me a copy to read and review. (Thanks, Mark!)

    I’m a bit behind the curve on this one – seems like everyone and their dogs have already read it (there’s even a Wiki entry!) – but I’m working on it and hope to have a review soon. I just got the book yesterday, and have already given it a few skim-throughs. Looks like a good read. (And the cover is super-cute, too!)

    In the meantime, go check out some of Mark’s other stuff. I recommend starting with Satya (rest in peace, my mostest favoritist animal lib magazine evah!) and then catching up on some of his more recent writings. (Ironically, there’s also a Mark Hawthorne who works as the Managing Director of McDonald’s. Unless Mark is going deep undercover, assume that they aren’t one in the same, and skip right through McD’s propagandtastic press releases.)

    More info about Striking at the Roots after the jump.

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    Another shout-out to Lantern Books (Yo!)

    Monday, May 14th, 2007

    Colbert Report Shout-Out

    Got another care package from the good folks at Lantern Books. Actually, I guess it was a few weeks ago now…wow, do I move slowly! Better stop dilly dallying here and get a-readin’.

    Anywho, this time they sent me copies of Aftershock by pattrice jones (of Eastern Shore Sanctuary fame) and Claude and Medea: The Hellburn Dogs by Zoe Weil. I started Aftershock last week, right before my basement flooded and I became otherwise occupied with waterlogged books and moldy floors. So far, all’s good – I’ve got high expectations for this one. While you’re waiting for my slow self to post a review, check out this one from invisible voices.

    On that note, I best retire to bed for the night.

    Thanks again, Kara!

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    My very first shout-out!

    Monday, November 13th, 2006

    I received my first package of swag in the mail Friday, so here comes the promised shout-out.

    Colbert Report Shout-Out

    Sorry, I had to do that. Really.

    Anywho – the good folks at Lantern Books sent me copies of Dr. Michael Greger’s newest book, Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching (tbr November 15),

    Bird Flu by Michael Greger

    as well as Hillary Rettig’s recent release, The Lifelong Activist: How to Change the World Without Losing Your Way.

    The Lifelong Activist by Hillary Rettig

    Thanks, guys!

    So far I’ve only had a chance to skim each, but they both look like good reads. Reviews forthcoming – I’ll post them here and on Amazon when I’m done.

    BTW, if you haven’t yet, go check out Lantern Books. Their catalog focuses on a number of progressive topics, including animal advocacy, vegetarianism, nature and environment, and social thought. They also maintain a mailing list for animal advocates and NYC residents (sign up to receive notices of NYC events, and watch while this Kansan turns green with envy).

    As always, if you’ve got a book, CD, movie, etc. that you’d like me to mention here and/or review – I like stuff. Especially free stuff. Details and contact info here.

    An interesting aside on Bird Flu – one of my biggest gripes with the mainstream media is their (collective) bad habit of not following up on stories. I was recently considering this in relation to the whole bird flu scare (remember how the bird flu reports practically disappeared after 2004, even though the virus is still spreading today?), when I happened to spot a mention of the bird flu on the CNN ticker.

    The general gist of it:

    The U.S. government has approved the use of firefighting foam to kill chickens quickly if there is an outbreak of deadly bird flu in commercial poultry.

    The Agriculture Department says water-based foam can be an alternative to carbon dioxide, which has traditionally been used to quickly kill large quantities of birds.

    Foam can be used to suffocate floor-reared flocks _ chickens and turkeys raised primarily for meat _ to contain deadly bird flu, said APHIS spokeswoman Karen Eggert. Foam also can be used in outbreaks of rapidly spreading disease such as Exotic Newcastle, a fatal respiratory virus in birds, when state or federal officials deem it necessary.

    And it can be used when birds are in structurally unsound buildings, such as a building damaged by a hurricane or other natural disaster, she said.

    But in Canada, a senior official with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said this form of killing is not considered humane and Canada will not adopt the practice.

    “The information that we have at this point in time suggests that rather than humanely destroying the birds, they in effect drown from inhaling the material, the water in it.”

    The practice has other critics. Animal rights advocates argue against using the foam because it suffocates the animals, and they are urging authorities to use gases instead.

    Lovely. And in their true lazy, ADD-addled fashion, nary a word of this was said on CNN. Apparently, only the intern who operates the ticker thought that widespread, government-endorsed animal cruelty was worth a mention.

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