Book Review: Join, Steve Toutonghi (2016)

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Quirky and thought-provoking, with a darkly humorous streak.

four out of five stars

(Full disclosure: I received a free ebook for review though Edelweiss. Trigger warning for offensive language.)

That kind of intimacy among drives is mocked by solos. Before most solo resentment hardened into religious resistance, there was a famous sketch comedy show, Howard, Howard, Howard, Howard, Howard, Howard, and Howard, that parodied the closeness. The seven Howards would stand in a circle, five men and two women, picking one another’s noses.

“In the beginning,” Rope Three says, “when Join was first introduced, and for a long time after, I assumed we’d all join. That we’d all become one single individual. Can you imagine that? No more other.”

Set in a distant (?) future that’s both inconceivable and all-too-familiar, Join takes the “soul mate” concept to the next level through its innovative “join” technology. Individuals – the vast majority of whom have already had their brains hacked into and connected to the biowave network via implants called “caddys” – can choose to join with one another, creating a single consciousness that lives on even after the death of a member (“drive”). Joins often start out as pairs – i.e., married couples – who later join with younger “honeymooner” couples. As the various drives work and save for additional licensing fees, the join can continue to accumulate more drives, whether they choose to merge with existing joins or court more desirable “solos.”

However, twenty is the upper limit for joins; after this, the competing perspectives can cause disorders in the join, such as the rare but terrifying meme virus. Likewise, the join must be consensual throughout the procedure and recovery/integration period; if one of or more the drives changes her mind, it could cause a “flip” – a progressive and fatal disorder.

(More below the fold…)