Greenpeace: We love Japan, but whaling breaks our hearts!

Tuesday, February 13th, 2007

Via Greenpeace:

We love Japan, but whaling breaks our hearts!

This Valentine’s Day, we’ll show love for whales by doing our best to keep the harpoons from striking a whale’s heart. But you don’t have to be here in the Southern Ocean to join us in our efforts to defend the whales.

We know you love whales too, and there’s no greater gift we could give them than to end commercial whaling forever.

So in honor of Valentine’s Day, there are a couple of things you can do to show your love for whales.

1. Take Action >> Send a special Valentine’s message to the Bush Administration professing your love of whales

2. Demonstrate Your Love >> Download one of our signs and take a picture of yourself holding it then upload it and show the world how much you care about defending the whales.

Please, spare us the heartbreak of returning to the Southern Ocean next year. Help us put an end to whaling once and for all.

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IFAW: Tell Iceland to Stop Hunting Whales

Wednesday, January 10th, 2007

Via the International Fund for Animal Welfare:

Tell Iceland to Stop Hunting Whales

Despite an international ban on whaling adopted in 1986, Iceland has announced plans to hunt whales commercially for the first time in twenty years. Permits have been granted by Iceland’s Ministry of Fisheries for the hunting of 30 minke whales and nine endangered fin whales. Commercial whaling is an out-dated and unnecessary industry that should have ended a century ago with the use of whale oil lamps. The government of Iceland should be supporting its nation’s thriving and growing whale watching industry rather than sinking money and its political reputation into promoting the cruel hunting of whales.

Write a letter to Iceland’s Embassy urging Iceland to call off this hunt before it’s too late.

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Kinship Circle: LETTER / Whales Slain For Sport In Faeroe Islands

Thursday, December 28th, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Kinship Circle – info [at] kinshipcircle.org
Date: Dec 27, 2006 4:04 PM
Subject: LETTER/ Whales Slain For Sport In Faeroe Islands

Kinship Circle Primary – PERMISSION TO CROSS-POST AS WRITTEN
(Please do not delete identity/disclaimer information)

WARNING: Some may find 2 photos below disturbing.

12/27/06 – Whales Slain For Sport In Danish Faeroe Islands
KINSHIP CIRCLE ACTION CAMPAIGN
http://www.KinshipCircle.org

SOURCE OF INFORMATION:
Defending Whales / Danish Faeroe Islands

Kinship Circle - 2006-12-27 - 01 - Whale Slaughter

Kinship Circle - 2006-12-27 - 02 - Whale Slaughter

Welcome to the Faeroe Islands, a self-governing community within the United Kingdom of Denmark. Recreational past time: Bludgeoning whales

(More below the fold…)

DawnWatch: Sea Shepherd heads for Antarctica — Brisbane’s Courier Mail, 24 November, 2006

Sunday, November 26th, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: DawnWatch – news [at] dawnwatch.com
Date: Nov 25, 2006 9:47 PM
Subject: Dawnwatch: Sea Shepherd heads for Antarctica — Brisbane’s Courier Mail, 24 November, 2006

The Sea Shepherd team doing their best to defend whales in Antarctica, and Brisbane’s Courier Mail (Australia) has run a terrific article, by Phil Bartsch, about the effort. It appeared in the Friday, November 24 edition of the paper headed, “To war over whales.”

It opens:

“Blood is about to be spilled into the icy blue waters off Antarctica again – much of it within the Australian Whale Sanctuary.

“But not if Captain Paul Watson can help prevent it.

“‘What’s the point of having a whale sanctuary if you can kill whales in it?’ argues the controversial founder and president of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society.

“‘I’m not going to stand around and do nothing and watch these magnificent creatures being slaughtered. The time for conferences and meetings and mail-outs and petitions is over.'”

(More below the fold…)

IFAW: Say No to Caribbean Whaling

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2006

Via the International Fund for Animal Welfare:

Say No to Caribbean Whaling

Despite a worldwide outcry against the hunting of whales and a ban on whaling in place since 1986, some Eastern Caribbean nations are shockingly calling for commercial whaling to be launched in the region.

At a recent meeting of Caribbean Fisheries Ministers, St. Kitts and Nevis Fisheries Minister Cedric Liburd called on Caribbean nations to follow Japan’s lead and engage in commercial whaling. But he didn’t stop here. He went on to suggest that tourists to the region should be fed whale meat, and that this would benefit the region’s tourism industry.

Send a letter to Tourism Ministers throughout the Caribbean urging them to tell their nation’s leaders not take up commercial whaling. Tell them to support the region’s thriving and growing whale watching industry – an industry worth more than U.S. $22 million annually.

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Ocean Conservancy: Right Whales Swimming in the Face of Danger

Monday, November 13th, 2006

Via the Ocean Conservancy:

Right Whales Swimming in the Face of Danger

As of last Friday, scientists reported that between 30 and 50 North Atlantic right whales were swimming in the Bay of Fundy off the coast of New Brunswick, Canada. Typically, they would have migrated south by this time of year. The problem with the right whales staying in these northern feeding grounds longer than usual is that the Canadian lobster fishing grounds are opening this week in precisely this area, putting right whales in the middle of danger. Because there are only about 350 North Atlantic right whales left, the loss of even one animal contributes to the risk of extinction.

Please take action today to help these right whales. Urge the Canadian Minister of Fisheries to delay opening the fishing grounds until the right whales have left the area and will no longer be in danger.

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IFAW: Tell Iceland to Stop Hunting Whales

Friday, October 20th, 2006

Via the International Fund for Animal Welfare:

Tell Iceland to Stop Hunting Whales

Despite an international ban on whaling adopted in 1986, Iceland has announced plans to hunt whales commercially for the first time in twenty years. Permits have been granted by Iceland’s Ministry of Fisheries for the hunting of 30 minke whales and nine endangered fin whales. Commercial whaling is an out-dated and unnecessary industry that should have ended a century ago with the use of whale oil lamps. The government of Iceland should be supporting its nation’s thriving and growing whale watching industry rather than sinking money and its political reputation into promoting the cruel hunting of whales.

Write a letter to Iceland’s Embassy urging Iceland to call off this hunt before it’s too late.

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IFAW: Take Action to Protect Whales

Thursday, August 24th, 2006

Via the International Fund for Animal Welfare:

Write a Letter to Stop Whaling

For years, the Japanese government has ignored pleas from the international community to stop whaling. At the most recent International Whaling Commission, no real progress was made to stop the cruel annual slaughter by Japan of thousands of whales each year in the name of “science.” In fact, it was the first time the pro-whaling side has won a majority on a key issue since the IWC adopted the ban twenty years ago.

Tell President Bush to oppose Japan’s permanent membership on the UN Security Council until Japan complies with international laws for the protection of whales. Security council membership is important to Japan. This strong consequence may be the only thing that can stop the unnecessary and cruel harpooning of thousands of whales each year.

Take Action

Please send an email to the President and then follow up with a brief and polite phone call to simply say:

“My name is….. from….. and I want to thank President Bush for his efforts to oppose whaling. I urge him to oppose Japan’s seat on the U.N. Security Council until Japan complies with the international laws to protect whales.”

You can reach the White House at 1-202-456-1111.

The Ocean Conservancy: Protect the remaining 300 North Atlantic right whales

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006

Via The Ocean Conservancy:

Only 300 Remain… You Can Help

Finally, The National Marine Fisheries Service has proposed rules that would slow ships and protect the remaining 300 North Atlantic right whales from the risk of being struck by these vessels. Thank you to all the ocean advocates who took action and helped contribute to this success.

While this is a huge victory, there is more we need to do to ensure that these new rules are effective at slowing down ships and saving the lives of endangered right whales. Please take action once again and urge the National Marine Fisheries Service to adopt the most protective options available when implementing this new rule. We need your help to make sure these proposed rules become effective on the water before we lose another right whale to a ship strike — the species’ leading cause of death.

DawnWatch: Whale vote loss at IWC covered in Time Magazine 7/3/06 and other articles 6/26/06

Wednesday, July 12th, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: DawnWatch – news [at] dawnwatch.com
Date: Jun 26, 2006 5:54 PM
Subject: DawnWatch: Whale vote loss at IWC covered in Time Magazine 7/3/06 and other articles 6/26/06

Last week the whales suffered a hit at the annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission. The July 3 edition of Time Magazine has summarized the situation in an article headed, “Revenge of The Whale Hunters; Japan says the giant mammals have recovered in the 20 years since whaling was banned. Tell that to the whales.”

It tells us that in 1986, with most species of whales in serious decline, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) voted to prohibit whaling, “allowing it only for scientific purposes or, in a handful of cases, such as among native peoples in Alaska and Greenland, to preserve ancient food-gathering practices.

“But the treaty has proved all too easy to get around. Japan, Iceland and Norway, in particular, have slaughtered tens of thousands of whales in the past 20 years. The first two countries claim they are doing it for science, although much of the meat they take ends up on dinner tables. Norway doesn’t even bother pretending. It openly flouts the IWC’s rules.

And at last week’s meeting Japan pushed through a resolution calling for a repeal of the whaling moratorium.”

(More below the fold…)

Greenpeace: Breaking News: Arctic Sunrise Storms into Whaling Meetings

Friday, June 23rd, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Greenpeace – webmaster [at] greenpeaceusa.org
Date: Jun 20, 2006 3:36 PM
Subject: Breaking News: Arctic Sunrise Storms into Whaling Meetings

Dear Kelly,

I’m writing you from St. Kitts, site of the 58th meeting of the International Whaling Commission. Our ship, the Arctic Sunrise, after being refused entry for more than a week, entered the waters of St. Kitts today to stage a peaceful protest. We landed on the beach and began placing more than 866 whale tails in the sand to symbolize the number of whales slaughtered by the Japanese government this year. Ten of our activists have already been arrested.

The International Whaling Commission meetings have just ended, and they dramatically displayed how narrow a margin exists between the pro-whaling and anti-whaling nations. A mere 2 votes (remember that number!) prevented Japan from eliminating conservation efforts for dolphins, porpoises, and small whales; and implementing a secret ballot. The Japanese delegation also narrowly lost their bids to abolish the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary, exempt themselves from the commercial whaling ban, and kick Greenpeace out of the IWC meetings.

And you should know that your efforts played a major role in these victories. Due to pressure from concerned people around the world, including thousands of emails and faxes from you, Guatemala and Honduras decided NOT to attend the IWC meetings. Those two votes made all the difference. THANK YOU!

But after losing several votes, Japan pulled out all the stops, and actually won a non-binding resolution pronouncing that whales are guilty of over-fishing – by 1 vote! That’s right, the Japanese succeeded in convincing more than 30 nations that whales eat too much fish! And that wasn’t the only fishy thing that happened during the meetings. One of Japan’s pro-whaling allies arrived late to the meetings with their membership fees in cash, in a brown paper bag.

TAKE ACTION

We’ve taken a stand against Japanese Whaling, now it’s your turn to send a strong message!

The stage is clearly set for next year’s meeting in Alaska, and it will take everything we have to turn the tide. Now more than ever, the fight to protect whales is at a critical phase. That’s why we’ve announced that we’ll be returning to the Southern Ocean this winter to confront the Japanese whalers again. Please, support our efforts, follow this story, and share the news with your friends and family.

Sincerely,

Buffy

Buffy Baumann
Ocean Campaigner

Defenders of Wildlife – Stop Japan’s Whale Hunt

Tuesday, June 13th, 2006

Another action alert, this one from Defenders of Wildlife:

Protect the largest creatures on earth!

Japan is poised — yet again — to increase whaling operations and wants to overturn the international whaling ban altogether.

Take Action Now! Write to the White House urging opposition to Japan’s permanent membership on the UN Security Council until Japan complies with international laws for the protection of whales.

For more information, and to take action, click here.

Additional alerts are available here.

DawnWatch: Consumer boycott of Japan over whaling recommended by CSM — 6/2/06

Sunday, June 4th, 2006

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: DawnWatch
Date: Jun 2, 2006 5:45 PM
Subject: DawnWatch: Consumer boycott of Japan over whaling recommended by CSM — 6/2/06

The Friday, June 2, Christian Science Monitor (a highly respected internationally distributed paper) carries an editorial (the paper’s view) headed, “Save the whales – by not buying Japanese.”

It tells us:

“Japan has spent heavily to influence poor countries that are members of the International Whaling Commission (IWC). It just announced a fresh $410 million aid package to South Pacific nations. Its aim is to reverse a 1986 IWC ban that has allowed many whale species to begin a long, slow recovery. In mid-June, the 66 nations of the regulatory body will gather, and Japan is expected to succeed in winning the votes of many cash-poor IWC members. Overturning the ban requires a 75 percent vote, but Japan may first secure a 51 percent vote to conduct balloting in secret.

“The prospect of the IWC allowing the slaughter of whale species not fully recovered has yet to raise much fuss in many antiwhaling nations. But it should, given the importance of whales in the health of oceans.

(More below the fold…)